Applying for an ASIC or an MSIC

Find out more about how to apply for an ASIC or an MSIC.

What type of ASIC do I need?

There are three different types of ASICs:

The type of ASIC you require will depend on your role and operational need. If you are unsure, please talk to your employer or issuing body.

Red ASIC

A valid red ASIC must be properly displayed in the airside security zone or secure area of a security controlled airport.

Grey ASIC

A valid grey ASIC must be properly displayed in a secure area (other than the airside security zone) of a security controlled airport.

White ASIC

A person might be required to hold a valid white ASIC, if employed in a security-sensitive role that requires a valid background check.

You may need a white ASIC, if you are contracted or employed by the following entities:

Visitor Identification Card

A visitor identification card (VIC) can be issued to a person, if the person needs to enter a secure area of a security controlled airport for a lawful purpose. The person must give the VIC issuer a written statement of the reasons why the person needs to enter the secure area.

A VIC holder must display a VIC when in a secure area of a security controlled airport and must be supervised by a holder of a valid ASIC while in a secure area.

To be issued a VIC, you must give the VIC issuer a written statement of the reasons why you need to enter the secure area and the VIC issuer must verify your identity.

For information on VICs and identification requirements refer to the VICs: How to verify your identity flyer PDF: 712 KB ReadSpeaker

A VIC cannot be issued to any person who:

  • has been refused an ASIC;
  • is the holder of a suspended ASIC; or
  • is the holder of a cancelled ASIC.

It is an offence for a VIC applicant not to disclose that they have been refused an ASIC, or had an ASIC suspended or cancelled.

A VIC may be issued by:

  • an airport operator;
  • an aircraft operator that operates a regular public transport operation; or
  • an authorised agent of the airport operator or Secretary-approved VIC issuer.

The Department of Immigration and Border Protection can issue VICs to law enforcement, intelligence and government officers who are on duty. The duration of these VICs is for no longer than 24 hours.

The 28-day rule

A person can be issued a VIC if they are required to enter a secure area of a security controlled airport for a lawful purpose for a maximum period of 28 days within a 12-month period. This is known as the 28-day rule.

There is a separate 28-day limit for each airport. The number of days a VIC has been issued at one airport does not count towards the number of days a VIC has been issued at a different airport.

Temporary Aircrew Card

A Temporary Aircrew Card (TAC) can be issued by an aircraft operator if the person:

  • holds a valid red or grey ASIC, however, the person does not physically have their ASIC on them; or
  • applied for a red or grey ASIC.

TACs can be issued as an alternative to a VIC for airline crew travelling with an aircraft across multiple airports.

TAC holders must be an employee or contractor of the aircraft operator and require access to more than one security controlled airport, travelling with a regular public transport aircraft.

TACs cannot be issued with a validity period more than 15 days.

For information on how to apply for a TAC, please contact your aircraft operator.

What type of MSIC do I need?

There are two types of MSICs:

The type of MSIC you require will depend on your role and operational need. If you are unsure, please talk to your employer or issuing body.

Blue MSIC

A valid blue MSIC must be properly displayed in a maritime security zone of a security regulated port or offshore facility.

White MSIC

A person might be required to hold a valid white MSIC, if employed in a security-sensitive role that requires a valid background check.

You may need a white MSIC, if you are contracted or employed by an MSIC issuing body.

Where do I apply and how much will it cost?

Please apply to an authorised ASIC or MSIC issuing body.

An issuing body is a person or agency authorised or prescribed to issue ASICs or MSICs.

More information on the authorised issuing bodies:

The cost to issue an ASIC or an MSIC varies between the issuing bodies. Contact issuing bodies directly for their current prices.

What do I need to apply?

New identity verification requirements

New requirements to verify your identity when applying for an ASIC or MSIC will start on 1 August 2017.

Find out how these changes will affect you.

You will need to provide your issuing body with original documents verifying your identity and evidence of your operational need before you can be issued a card.

For more information on how to apply for an ASIC or MSICs refer to the:

  • Aviation Security Identification Card (ASIC) information for cardholders and applicants PDF: 2529 KB ReadSpeaker
  • Maritime Security Identification Card (MSIC) information for cardholders and applicants PDF: 2401 KB ReadSpeaker

How do I verify my identity?

From 1 August 2017, when applying for an ASIC or an MSIC, you will need to present your original identification documents in person to your issuing body, or their representative.

You will need to present original identification documents that meet the following:

  • the start of your identity in Australia i.e. birth certificate or ImmiCard (Category A);
  • a photographic Government-issued document that shows your signature i.e. a driver licence or passport (Category B);
  • evidence of your identity within the community i.e. Medicare card or marriage certificate (Category C); and
  • evidence of your current residential address i.e. a utility bill or rates notice (CategoryD).

A Category D document is only required if categories A, B, or C do not include your current residential address.

More information on verifying your identity can be found here:

  • Identity verification – information for applicants and cardholders PDF: 353 KB ReadSpeaker

What is job ready?

Although you cannot be issued a card until you provide evidence of operational need, some issuing bodies can accept ASIC or MSIC applications prior to receiving evidence of operational need.

At a glance:

  • Your application may be refused, if you have an adverse or disqualifying criminal record.
  • You may be able to apply for a discretionary review after you receive the result of your background check and before you have evidence of an operational need.
  • You must report any aviation or maritime-security-relevant offences that occur after you have started your application process.

How do I provide evidence of my operational need?

To prove you have an operational need for an ASIC or an MSIC, you must provide written evidence to support your claim. This includes (but is not limited to):

  • a letter explaining your reason(s) for accessing secure areas or zones from one of the following:
    • your employer or prospective employer; or
    • a contracting party or prospective contracting party; or
    • the industry participant responsible for the location you require access to.
  • A letter from a recent employer and/or certificates of qualifications about your need to access a secure area/zone. These documents should be dated no more than six months before you submit your application.
  • Evidence of a licence that demonstrates you will require access to secure areas or zones. For example, aviation or maritime pilot’s licence.

An issuing body may require one or more examples of evidence supporting your claim of operational need before they issue you with a card.

What criteria am I assessed against?

Proposed new eligibility criteria for the ASIC and MSIC schemes

Pending legislative approval, new eligibility criteria for the ASIC and MSIC schemes will be introduced.

Find out how these changes will affect you.

When processing your application, your issuing body will:

  • verify your identity;
  • request a background check through AusCheck;
  • confirm your operational need for an ASIC or an MSIC; and
  • confirm your right to work in Australia, if necessary.

What does the background check consider?

AusCheck, within the Attorney-General’s Department (AGD), coordinates the ASIC and MSIC background checks which comprise:

  • a security assessment by the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO).

    ASIO security assessments consider factors about security as defined in the ASIO Act 1979.

    Security assessments are not character checks and factors such as criminal history, dishonesty or deceit are only relevant to ASIO’s advice, if they have a bearing on security considerations.

For more information regarding the application process contact your ASIC or MSIC issuing body directly.

What if I am under 18?

If you are under the age of 18, you will be required to undergo a background check which includes a national security assessment and, where required, a right to work check. A criminal history check is not included for applicants under 18 years of age.

If you are younger than 14 years of age, your parent or guardian must provide written consent on your application form in order for you to undergo the national security assessment.

Please refer to the following factsheet for more information:

  • An ASIC or MSIC applicant under the age of 18 years PDF: 465 KB ReadSpeaker