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Section 3 : Agency Outcomes

This section explains how the resources identified in Section 2 will be used to deliver outputs and administered items to contribute to the one outcome for AMSA.

3.1 Summary of outcomes, outputs and administered items

OUTCOMES AND OUTPUTS GROUPS

AMSA works to achieve Outcome 1 specified by Government for the Transport and Regional Services Portfolio: Fostering an efficient, sustainable, competitive, safe and secure transport system.

AMSA has established two intermediate outcomes reflecting the benefit that AMSA seeks to achieve for the Australian community that contribute directly to the achievement of the portfolio's broader outcome:

  • Minimising the risk of shipping incidents and pollution in Australian waters

  • Maximising the number of people saved from maritime and aviation incidents.

The following section provides an agency overview, and then each outcome is discussed in turn. The map on the following page shows the relationship between AMSA's two intermediate outcomes and the portfolio Outcome 1 and AMSA's five outputs, which represent the external services produced by AMSA consistent with its intermediate outcomes.

OUTPUT COST ATTRIBUTION

AMSA operates a time management system, which provides an integrated approach to the identification of output costs and the internal transfer pricing arrangements between its internal business units.

It provides a framework and a standard corporate activity listing of outputs (services, activities and tasks) undertaken across AMSA that are linked to AMSA's core business processes and performance outcomes.

It tracks both staff time and costs spent on a range of services (outputs) and provides the aggregate costing and resource allocation information for these services (outputs). It also tracks staff time and cost of work undertaken by one Business Unit on behalf of another, through the internal transfer pricing mechanism.

CHANGES TO OUTCOMES AND OUTPUTS

There have been no changes to AMSA's Outcome and output structure from the 2004-05 PBS.

Figure 3.1: Outcomes and output groups

Figure 3.1: Outcomes and output groups

(click on the image to view the larger version)

TRENDS IN RESOURCING ACROSS AMSA INTERMEDIATE OUTCOMES

Chart 3.1: Trends in appropriation for all AMSA Intermediate Outcomes ($ millions)

Chart 3.1: Trends in appropriation for all AMSA Intermediate Outcomes ($ millions)

(click on the image to view the larger version)

The increase in budget appropriations to AMSA Outcome 2 in 2004-05 and in 2005-06 arises from the additional funding for the new budget measures to strengthen AMSA's search and rescue capability.

AMSA INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME 1 - DESCRIPTION

Minimising the Risk of Shipping Incidents and Pollution in Australian Waters

The portfolio outcome of fostering an efficient, sustainable, competitive, safe and secure transport system encompasses the promotion of high standards of ship safety and marine environment protection in Australian waters. As shipping is an international industry, a range of international treaties determines its standards of safety and environment protection, principally promulgated by the International Maritime Organization (IMO). AMSA contributes to the IMO's development of relevant international standards and to measures that encourage their implementation and enforcement by all flag States.

AMSA seeks to enhance the responsiveness and capability of the national regulatory framework to deal with contemporary ship safety and pollution prevention issues. New and revised international standards are expeditiously adopted into Australian law using a performance and outcomes based regulatory approach, where appropriate, and the adoption of a safety culture is actively promoted within the maritime industry.

AMSA is a member of the Australian Maritime Group and the National Marine Safety Committee (NMSC). It supports the NMSC's work in promoting consistent national maritime standards to facilitate the movement of vessels and personnel between State, Territory and Commonwealth jurisdictions and improve safety of commercial and recreational vessels.

AMSA continues to refine its ship inspection risk management strategies to improve the identification of higher risk ships. Specific ship safety and operational issues are targeted during ship inspections through AMSA's focused and concentrated inspection campaigns. Active participation is maintained in regional forums with the aim of improving cooperation in ship inspection and data exchange to combat substandard ships in the region. AMSA is involved in facilitating the transition to the revised standards for seafarer qualifications under the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW95), particularly in relation to State and Territory harmonisation of standards. It also is involved in strengthening the regulation of coastal pilotage services and implementing several IMO environmental conventions.

As managing agency for the National Plan to Combat Pollution of the Sea by Oil and Other Noxious and Hazardous Substances, AMSA continues to take a lead role in its administration in consultation with industry and State and Territory Governments.

AMSA provides navigational safety services in keeping with Australia's international obligations based on a Five Year Strategic Plan for Marine Aids to Navigation. This includes effective management of contracts for the provision of maintenance services for the national aids to navigation network by an external provider.

AMSA INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME 2 - DESCRIPTION

Maximising the number of people saved from maritime and aviation incidents

The portfolio outcome of fostering an efficient, sustainable, competitive, safe and secure transport system encompasses the provision of effective search and rescue coordination services over the internationally agreed Australian search and rescue region, in accordance with international treaties, and maintaining safety communications services primarily for commercial shipping.

AMSA provides a 24-hour Emergency Response Centre (ERC) servicing the Australian search and rescue region of almost 53 million square kilometres. It also provides training and specialised equipment to a number of contracted aviation operators to enable them to effectively provide search and rescue services under the coordination of the ERC. It continues to work with State and Territory search and rescue agencies to strengthen formal arrangements, operational protocols in search and rescue coordination, and cooperation and sharing of strategic information in relation to particular search and rescue incidents.

The ERC facilitate the multi-disciplinary management of maritime incidents including coordination of the search and rescue operation, monitoring operational standards of any emergency towage and/or salvage operation, and planning and responding to any real or threatened pollution of the marine environment.

AMSA also provides a distress and safety communications network that meets the requirements of the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System under the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) Convention and can be used by suitably equipped non-SOLAS vessels (ie vessels less than 300 tonnes). This involves management of the provision of these services by an external provider.

AMSA administers a ship reporting system that identifies and tracks ships at sea as a safety measure and provides a database of ships that may be in a position to respond to an emergency situation at sea.

It provides two ground stations and a Mission Control Centre for the Cospas-Sarsat satellite distress beacon detection system. The cessation of satellite processing of 121.5 MHz distress beacon alerts from 2009 is the focus of AMSA's education and awareness program to alert the public to the benefits of upgrading to the superior 406 MHz distress beacon. Public awareness of boating and aviation safety and greater responsibility for personal safety is being promoted in AMSA's promotion of maritime and aviation educational campaigns.

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3.2 Outcomes resourcing

OUTCOME 1 RESOURCING

Table 3.1 below details the total resources for AMSA to contribute to the achievement of portfolio Outcome 1 in 2005-06, including administered expenses, revenue from government (appropriation), revenue from other sources, and the total price of outputs.

Table 3.1: Total resources for Outcome 1

PERFORMANCE INFORMATION FOR OUTCOME 1

Portfolio Outcome 1 - contribution of AMSA outputs

AMSA Intermediate Outcome 1, Minimising the risk of shipping incidents and pollution in Australian waters, involves contributions from the following four outputs that comprise AMSA's Output Group 1: Ship Operations and Safety and Marine Environment Protection Program:

Output 1.1: Safety and environment protection standards for responsible operation of ships

Output 1.2: Infrastructure for monitoring compliance with safety and environment protection standards

Output 1.3: A capability to respond to marine pollution incidents

Output 1.4: Systems that aid safe marine navigation.

AMSA Intermediate Outcome 2, Maximising the number of people saved from maritime and aviation incidents, involves contributions from the following output that comprises AMSA's Output Group 2: Search and Rescue Program:

Output 2.1: A capability to detect, locate and rescue persons in maritime and aviation distress situations.

Performance information for AMSA Intermediate Outcomes 1 and 2

AMSA Intermediate Outcome 1: Minimising the risk of shipping incidents and pollution in Australian waters

In assessing the effectiveness of AMSA's overall performance in the achievement of its first intermediate outcome, AMSA seeks to reduce over time the ratio of reports to AMSA under the Navigation Act 1912 of pollution incidents, ship inspection deficiencies and ship operation incidents compared to the total number of ship voyages to Australia. The targets for each type of incident for 2005-06 are as follows:

(a) Pollution incidents: 0.7%
(b) Ship inspection deficiencies: 2.3 average per inspection
(c) Ship operation incidents: 0.2%

AMSA Intermediate Outcome 2: Maximising the number of people saved from maritime and aviation incidents

In assessing the effectiveness of AMSA's overall performance in the achievement of its second outcome, AMSA seeks to increase over time the percentage of saved lives as a proportion of lives at risk. (A person is defined as being at risk if the person has a chance of surviving the initial incident.) The target is 100%.

Figure 3.2: Performance information for AMSA Intermediate Outcome 1

Portfolio Outcome: Fostering an efficient, sustainable, competitive, safe and secure transport system
Intermediate Outcome 1: Minimising the risk of shipping incidents and pollution in Australian waters
Output Group 1: Ship Operations Safety and Marine Environment Protection Program
Measure
Target
Output 1.1: Safety and environment protection standards for responsible operation of ships: AMSA provides a regulatory framework of safety and environmental protection standards for Australia consistent with international treaties and contemporary safety management systems.
Sub-Output 1.1.1: Provision of an Australian regulatory framework and operational standards for maritime safety and marine environment protection that encourages industry to improve its safety and environmental performance.
Currency and relevance of the Australian regulatory framework (Quality)

Proportion of accepted recommendations actioned from audit/incident investigation of Australian flagged vessels (Quality)

Cost to provide the framework (Price)

All relevant international standards implemented

100% of recommendations actioned in an appropriate manner and timeframe


2005-06 estimates: $3.2 million

Sub-Output 1.1.2: Promotion of a safety culture in the maritime industry by influencing industry attitudes, behaviours and business practices.

Improvement in the standard of foreign flag ships operating in Australian waters (Quality)

Cost of promoting a safety culture in the maritime industry (Price)

Declining trend in average number of deficiencies per inspection

2005-06 estimates: $1.0 million

Sub-Output 1.1.3: Participation and influence in international and regional maritime forums and partnerships.
Proportion of issues of significant to Australian identified and actively pursued to influence outcomes (Quality)

Cost of participation in international and regional maritime forums and partnerships meetings (Price)

100%


2005-06 estimates: $2.5 million

Output 1.2: An infrastructure for monitoring compliance with safety and environment protection standards: AMSA monitors compliance with international standards by conducting inspections of ships, cargoes and cargo handling equipment in Australian ports, oversighting ship operations in Australian waters (including coastal pilotage in Torres Strait and the Great Barrier Reef) and issues certificates of competency to seafarers.
Sub-Output 1.2.1: Improve compliance with standards covering ship condition, operation and handling of cargoes through maintaining and enhancing strategic relationships, increased public and industry awareness on compliance matters.
Inspection rate of risk assessed eligible ships under the port State control program covering all ships and single visit ships (Quality)



Single-hull tankers - 100%
Other high risk ships - 80%
Medium to high risk ships - 60%
Low to medium risk ships - 40%
Low risk ships- 25%
Overall target = > 50%


AMSA allocation of priority to older high risk ships (15 or more years) when eligible for inspection 90% of inspections of ships in this risk group within first two port visits after the ship becomes eligible
Improvement in the standard of foreign flag ships operating in Australian waters (Quality) Declining trend in average deficiencies per inspection
Extent of industry compliance (Quality) Declining trend in average number of non-conformances per ISM audit
Number of Port State Control inspections (Quantity) PSC inspections 2005 estimates: 3,150
Number of Flag State Control inspections (Quantity) FSC inspections 2005 estimates: 95
Average cost of undertaking port and flag State control inspections (Price) Port State inspections: 2005-06 estimates: $650/inspection
Flag state inspections 2005-06 estimates: $450/inspection
Cost of providing a compliance monitoring infrastructure and industry awareness of compliance matters (Price) 2005-06 estimates: $14.7 million
Output 1.2: An infrastructure for monitoring compliance with safety and environment protection standards: AMSA monitors compliance with international standards by conducting inspections of ships, cargoes and cargo handling equipment in Australian ports, oversighting ship operations in Australian waters (including coastal pilotage in Torres Strait and the Great Barrier Reef) and issues certificates of competency to seafarers.
Sub-Output 1.2.2: Maintain a high standard of seafarers' qualifications.
IMO endorsement of seafarer qualifications system as being compliant with international standards (Quality) Maintain Australia's inclusion on IMO "White List" of STCW95 compliant administrations
Australia's involvement in IMO assessments of flag administrations "White List" status
Number of certificates issued (Quantity) 2005-06 estimates: 600 certifications, 550 oral examinations
Person hours spent (Quantity) 2005-06 estimates: 19,000 hours
Percentage of PSC inspections with deficiencies relating to crew qualifications (Quantity) Declining trend in the average number of deficiencies per inspection
Cost of maintaining marine qualifications and certification system (Price) 2005-06 estimates: $1.5 million
Output 1.3: Capability to respond to marine pollution incidents: AMSA manages the National Plan to Combat Pollution of the Sea by Oil and Other Noxious and Hazardous Substances, which involves providing oil and chemical spill preparedness and response capabilities in consultation with State and Northern Territory Governments, port corporations and authorities, shipping, oil, exploration and chemical industries and emergency services.
Sub-Output 1.3.1: Provide a level of response capability consistent with National Plan requirements.
Availability of support resources and equipment (Quality) 95% availability
Implementation of recommendations from reviews of exercises and responses to spills (Quality) 100% implementation of accepted recommendations
Number of trained and equipped personnel (Quantity) 40 National Response Team personnel available/200 personnel trained each two year cycle
Cost of maintaining a response capability (Price) 2005-06 estimates: $4.7 million
Output 1.4: Systems that aid safe marine navigation: AMSA provides technical, maintenance and engineering project management services supporting the provision of the national network of integrated aids to navigation and traffic management measures to meet the needs of commercial shipping for safe and efficient coastal navigation. AMSA also provides a safety communications network under the International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS).
Sub-Output 1.4.1: Enhancement of systems that aid safe navigation.
National Aids to Navigation Network
Marine navigational aids network meets requirements of the five-year Navigational Strategic Plan for Marine Aids to Navigation (Quality) 100% in priority strategies executed on time and within budget
Availability of the marine navigational aids network (Quality) Visual: Category 1 - 99.8%
Category 2 - 99.0%
Category 3 - 97.0%
Racons: 99.6%
Tideguages: 99.6%
DGPS: 99.6%
Ship Reporting System: 98%
Unlit Beacons: 95%
Topmarks and daymarks: 95%
Cost to provide a network of aids to navigation (Price) 2005-06 estimates:$18.4 million
Safety Communications Network
Median time taken to distribute safety information messages (Quality) 2 hours
Capability to monitor successful transmission of safety messages (Quantity) 100%
Cost to provide maritime safety messages (Price) 2005-06 estimates: $0.4 million

Figure 3.3: Performance information for AMSA Intermediate Outcome 2

Portfolio Outcome: Fostering an efficient, sustainable, competitive, safe and secure transport system
Intermediate Outcome 2: Maximising the number of people saved from maritime and aviation incidents
Output Group 2: Search and Rescue Program
Measure
Target
Output 2.1: A capability to detect, locate and rescue persons in maritime and aviation distress situations: AMSA maintains safety communications services and provides a 24-hour search and rescue coordination service over the internationally agreed Australian Search and Rescue Region.
Sub-Output 2.1.1: Provide a 24 hour Emergency Response Centre (ERC).
Availability of the ERC (Quality) 100%
An RCC established that can handle a number of incidents, searches, and AUSREP reports distributed evenly over year (Quantity) 15,000 incidents
500 searches
240,000 AUSREP reports
Cost of providing the ERC (Price) 2005-06 estimates: $8.8 million
Sub-Output 2.1.2: Provide distress and safety communications services
Availability of each system (Quality) 99.5%
Number of COSPAS/SARSAT ground segments and Mission Control Centre (MCC) (Quantity) 2 ground stations/1 MCC
Number of Maritime Communications terrestrial and satellite stations (Quantity) 2 terrestrial stations at Wiluna, Western Australia, and Charleville, Queensland and 1 satellite station at Perth
Cost of providing distress and safety communications services (Price) 2005-06 estimates: $5.4 million
Sub-Output 2.1.3: Provide trained and equipped search and rescue response assets.
Availability of Search and Rescue Units (SRUs) (Quality) 4 dedicated and 58 on an opportunity basis
Number capable of deploying equipment, searching, rescuing (Quality) 13 to deploy equipment
62 to search
21 to rescue
Number of trained SRUs (Quantity) 62
Number of trained pilots and crew (Quantity) 345
Cost of providing trained and equipped search and rescue response assets 2005-06 estimates: $11.6 million
Output 2.1: A capability to detect, locate and rescue persons in maritime and aviation distress situations:
AMSA maintains safety communications services and provides a 24-hour search and rescue coordination service over the internationally agreed Australian Search and Rescue Region.
Sub-Output 2.1.4: Maintain and enhance strategic relationships and increase public awareness of maritime safety issues.

Number of issues/problems identified in agreements or programs (Quality)

Number of agreements developed or varied satisfactorily (Quantity)

In conjunction with States and Territories, number of education programs supported (Quantity)

Cost of maintaining and enhancing strategic relationships and increasing public awareness of maritime safety issues (Price)

0

4

5

2005-06 estimates: $1.3 million

Sub-Output 2.1.5: Provide an effective response to search and rescue incidents.

Median time for ERC to initiate response (Quality)

Median time for first unit to commence response action (Quality)

Median time until asset on scene (Quality)
Incident within <50 nautical miles of search base
Incident within 50 to 200 nautical miles of search base
Incident within 200 to 500 nautical miles of search base

A capability to respond to incidents (Quantity)

Median cost per search (Price)

30 minutes

30 minutes


30 minutes
60 minutes
90 minutes

Maintain above capability

$3,700

EVALUATIONS

AMSA has an established system of effective internal and external audits to regularly review particular activities relating to each of its two intermediate outcomes and the relevant results are discussed in the annual report.

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