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Federal Government Extends Black Spot Programme

Ron Boswell

Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Transport and Regional Services
Leader of the National Party in the Senate
Senator for Queensland

B1/Budget

14th May 2002

The Federal Government has delivered on its commitment to extend the road safety Black Spot Programme by providing $180 million over four years towards reducing crashes at sites and sections of road with a poor safety history.

The National Black Spot Programme will now continue until 30 June 2006, in line with the Government's future action plan for transport, Keeping Australia Moving.

The Federal Budget reveals that Black Spot funding for 2002-03 will be $45 million nationally - an increase on the average annual allocation of around $38 million during the past six years. Each state and territory will receive an annual Black Spot allocation according to population and proportion of casualty crashes.

"Given about 60 percent of fatalities and 50 percent of serious injuries occur on rural roads, half the programme funds will be reserved for reducing road trauma in rural areas," Parliamentary Secretary for Transport and Regional Services, Senator Ron Boswell said.

"The Black Spot Programme has been instrumental in reducing road trauma, which costs the Australian community $15 billion a year," he said.

"The very fact that the national toll is not rising in line with increases in population and vehicle usage in recent years indicates this cooperative effort to improve road safety by federal, state, local governments, and the community appears to be working.

"A Bureau of Transport and Regional Economics evaluation of the Black Spot Programme had supported a strong case for its continuation and that is what the government is doing.

"The report indicated the programme had been extraordinarily successful, returning an average $14 in benefit for every $1 invested and preventing more than 1,500 serious crashes in its first three years."

Senator Boswell said widespread community consultation and participation through state consultative panels was important to the programme's success. "Each is chaired by a person appointed by the Parliamentary Secretary and includes representatives from state road and transport agencies, local government and community and road user groups," he said.

"The Coalition re-introduced the Black Spot programme in July 1996 after Labor abolished it.

"By the end of 2001-02, the Federal Government will have invested more than $227 million over six years for treatment of identified black spots around the nation, with priority given to locations having a history of serious road accidents," Senator Boswell said.

The Black Spot Programme targets dangerous sites, in addition to other Federal Government road funding initiatives. The programme will be evaluated again to determine whether it continues to achieve good outcomes for road safety.

Media contact: Paul Leven 02 6277 3244 or 07 3001 8150

Black Spot Programme Funding Allocations 2002-03 - 2005-06

 

State

 

2002-03

$m

 

2003-04

$m

 

2004-05

$m

 

2005-06

$m

 

Total

$m

New South Wales

14.3

14.3

14.3

14.3

57.2

Victoria

10.4

10.4

10.4

10.4

41.7

Queensland

8.9

8.9

8.9

8.9

35.7

Western Australia

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

19.9

South Australia

3.5

3.5

3.5

3.5

14.0

Tasmania

1.1

1.1

1.1

1.1

4.5

Northern Territory

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

2.7

ACT

0.6

0.6

0.6

0.6

2.4

Administration and evaluation

0.5

0.5

0.5

0.5

2.0

Total

45.0

45.0

45.0

45.0

180.0

Figures may not add to totals due to rounding.