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Report on performance

Outcome 2-Transport Outputs and Programs

Output 2.3.3-Aviation and airports policy, programs and regulation

Highlights

On 10 April 2008, the Minister announced the need for a national aviation policy and released an issues paper, Towards a National Aviation Policy Statement, for discussion. The Department received over 280 stakeholder submissions on the issues paper.

An aviation discussion paper (green paper) will be released later in 2008, followed by a second round of consultation. The policy development process will culminate in the release of an aviation policy statement (white paper) in mid-2009.

The policy statement will provide greater planning and investment certainty for the industry and address community and environmental impacts associated with aviation.

In March 2008 a landmark 'open skies' air services agreement was signed between Australia and the United States of America. This was followed in June 2008 by the signing of a 'horizontal' air services agreement with the European Commission, the precursor to a comprehensive 'open skies' agreement.

Overview

Output 2.3.3 is delivered by the Aviation and Airports business division.

The Department's responsibilities under Output 2.3.3 include:

  • fostering a competitive, sustainable and safe aviation sector through appropriate policy development, regulation and program delivery;
  • advising the Minister on a range of aviation and airports issues;
  • working closely with portfolio agencies - the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA), Airservices Australia and the International Air Services Commission (IASC) - and other government agencies;
  • representing Australia's interests in international regulatory forums, such as the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO);
  • administering the government's interests in privatised airports under the Airports Act 1996; and
  • advising the Minister and other key stakeholders on the efficient management of aircraft noise and emissions domestically and internationally.

In 2007-08, the output administered seven programs:

  • Airport Lessee Companies - reimbursement of parking fines;
  • Compensation for the sale of airport land;
  • Implementation of noise amelioration;
  • International Civil Aviation Organization - contribution;
  • Payment scheme for Airservices Australia's en route charges;
  • Remote Aerodrome Safety Program (previously known as the Regional and Remote Airstrips Funding Scheme); and
  • Sydney West Airport - rental properties.

Output 2.3.3 corresponds to Output 1.4.2 in the previous outcome and output structure (see Appendix L for a comparison between the current and previous structures).

Table 4.24 summarises the output's performance in 2007-08.

Summary of performance

Table 4.24 Summary of performance - Output 2.3.3 - Aviation and airports policy, programs and regulation

Performance indicators Results
Effectiveness

Industry operates in a robust and stable regulatory environment.

 

This year saw the commencement of a major review of the policy settings for Australian aviation and its regulation. The Department assisted in the development of a wide-ranging issues paper, published in April 2008, seeking comments from the industry and general public by the end of June. The Australian Government intends to release a reen paper (discussion paper) later in 2008, as a basis for further consultation, and to release a final policy statement in 2009.

The broad policy review will build upon two reviews of specific aspects of the regulatory framework that were conducted in 2007-08 with support from the Department.

  • A joint industry-government review of reform to the civil aviation regulations examined ways to expedite progress towards an updated and outcome-based set of regulations which are effective in protecting safety standards without imposing unwarranted requirements on operators.
  • An expert review of the working arrangements between the Civil Aviation Safety Authority, as regulator, and the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, as independent investigator of accidents and incidents, examined options for legislative or operational changes to improve interaction between the agencies in the interests of the best overall outcomes for aviation safety.

Reports of both reviews were published in the first half of 2008. Some of the practical measures identified have been implemented; others will be addressed in conjunction with the broader range of issues raised in the current review process.

The Department also coordinated the response by agencies to a comprehensive audit of Australia's regulatory arrangements by the International Civil Aviation Organization as part of the Universal Safety Oversight Audit Program (USOAP). The final report of the audit is yet to be received. While the results are expected to recognise that the arrangements in Australia are among the most advanced, the cyclical audit process provides an opportunity to identify areas for further improvement.

In support of the objective of ensuring stable and effective regulatory arrangements for air transport in the Asia-Pacific region, the Department took part in a number of projects to assist Australia's near neighbours. This included setting up a safety assistance package to support Indonesia in addressing its transport safety challenges for the period 2007-10.

Specific developments in regulatory legislation included:

  • finalisation of the Civil Aviation Legislation Amendment (1999 Montreal Convention and other Measures) Act 2008, which implements the 1999 Montreal Convention to update the potential legal liability of international airlines; and
  • preparation of the Aviation Legislation Amendment (International Airline Licences and Carriers' Liability Insurance) Bill 2008, to update two aviation regulatory programs, the system of airlines' mandatory liability insurance and the system of international airline licences.

Businesses and consumers have access to competitive international and domestic air services.

Air services agreements/arrangements, including a landmark 'open skies' agreement with the United States of America, were negotiated with nine countries.

Aviation relations with the European Union, Australia's largest aviation market, were strengthened by signing the Horizontal Agreement and commencing negotiations for an Australia-European Union comprehensive air services agreement. The Horizontal Agreement recognises the existence of a single European market for air transport links to and from Australia and forms the basis of future discussions on a single Europe-wide air services agreement.

The Department continued to support access to air services in regional Australia through targeted and transitional subsidies for en route air traffic control charges and funding support for safety upgrades at remote aerodromes.

While aviation services continue to grow overall, notwithstanding increases in fuel costs, the growth has not been uniform. In particular, concerns have been expressed about the future of some sectors of the general aviation industry. During 2007-08, the Department supported the work of an industry group which conducted consultations with industry participants and examined options for improving the outlook in the sector. The findings of the group, originally expected to form part of a general aviation industry action agenda, will now be considered as an input to the broad policy review process.

Airspace is managed efficiently within international standards.

The Office of Airspace Regulation, a new arm of the Civil Aviation Safety Authority, commenced operations in 2007-08 under the Airspace Act 2007. With these changes, CASA became responsible for Australian airspace regulation. This completed the separation of the regulatory powers over airspace, previously held by Airservices Australia, from the role of air navigation service provider, in accordance with international standards.

An initial Australian Airspace Policy Statement came into effect in July 2007 to set broad directions for the management of airspace under the new legislation. An early review of the statement has been commenced to refine the statement in the light of initial experience under the new arrangements.

Australian Government investments in transport infrastructure are managed responsibly.

In 2007-08, decisions concerning major development plans and master plans were made under a modified system introduced as a result of May 2007 amendments to the Airports Act 1996. Where necessary, external companies were retained to provide expert advice on technical matters.

The Sydney Airport Demand Management Amendment Act 2008 was passed by Parliament in June 2008, amending the Sydney Airport Demand Management Act 1997 to reflect international aviation industry practice by amending the definition of a 'slot'.

Airport price regulation was expanded to include monitoring of long and short- term car-parking costs, prices and revenues.

Community exposure to aircraft noise is minimised with attention to the needs of specific communities.

The noise amelioration programs for Adelaide and Sydney are being wound down. All scheduled building and construction work was completed in 2006-07.

The Department continued to provide secretariat support to the Sydney Airport Community Forum to facilitate communication between the airport, industry, government and the community. The forum was reconstituted by the Minister in January 2008 to restore the community's ability to have direct input into decisions about the operation of the airport and, in particular, the impacts of the airport's proposal to build runway end safety works at the western end of the east-west runway that would have implications for traffic and noise sharing.

The Department continued its participation in international forums on the subjects of aircraft noise and emissions, and its work on the development of aircraft noise and emissions software to assist airports and communities to work together on these issues.

Price

$34.7 million

The actual price of this output in 2007-08 was $33.6 million.

Overall performance Fully achieved.

Detailed report on performance

Effectiveness - Output 2.3.3

Industry operates in a robust and stable regulatory environment.

Australian aviation safety regulation

The Department worked closely with CASA to improve the safety of the aviation sector, and provided advice to the Minister on the strategic oversight of CASA and Airservices Australia.

Two reviews of aspects of the regulatory framework for aviation were completed in 2007-08.

In April 2007, the Aviation Regulation Review Taskforce was established to review and recommend improvements to Australia's aviation safety regulatory model and regulatory reform program. The taskforce was chaired by Dr Allan Hawke and included industry and government representatives, with the Department providing secretariat services.

The taskforce held monthly meetings between May and December 2007 and submitted its report to the Minister in December 2007. The report was publicly released on the CASA's website www.casa.gov.au in June 2008.

In October 2007, Mr Russell Miller was appointed to conduct a review of the working relationship between the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) and CASA. The review was informed by submissions from 29 industry participants, providing a broad spectrum of opinion from across the aviation industry as well as the maritime and rail industries. Mr Miller presented his report to the Minister in December 2007. The review was publicly released on the Department's website in March 2008.

The outcomes of these two reviews will be considered as part of the broader review of national aviation policy that commenced with the release of an issues paper in April 2008. The Department is handling submissions made in response to the issues paper, and developing a discussion paper to trigger the next stage of the policy review process towards the end of 2008.

International aviation environment

The Department contributed to the international regulatory environment for aviation by participating in international forums and working with aviation regulators in other countries, particularly in the Asia-Pacific region. Through this international collaboration, the Department also worked to maintain and improve Australia's position in international aviation markets.

ICAO audit

As part of its responsibilities as a member of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), Australia is required to undergo periodic ICAO audits of the effectiveness of its aviation safety regulatory oversight. An ICAO audit was conducted in February 2008 by an international team of nine technical experts.

The audit included scrutiny of all the Australian agencies with a responsibility for aviation safety oversight and service provision, namely the Department, Airservices Australia, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (in respect of search and rescue), the Australian Transport Safety Authority, the Bureau of Meteorology and CASA. The audit team also visited industry organisations to establish the extent to which safety oversight requirements are implemented in practice.

The Department was responsible for coordinating Australia's role in the audit. This included creating a working group, with membership drawn from each of the agencies, to make preparations for the audit and to provide a response to the audit in the form of a corrective action plan.

The results of an ICAO audit are documented in a confidential report which is circulated to all 191 contracting states. The final report of the Australian audit, including Australia's corrective action plan, is expected to be released in November 2008. Early indications are that the results for Australia were good.

Montreal Convention

On 26 June 2008, the Parliament passed legislation to implement the Convention for the Unification of Certain Rules for International Carriage by Air (the Montreal Convention), which was ratified by ICAO on 28 May 1999. The Montreal Convention provides a modern and consolidated framework for determining the liability of air carriers if the following events occur in the course of international air travel:

  • injury or death of a passenger;
  • loss or damage to cargo and baggage; or
  • damage caused by delay in the scheduled arrival of a passenger, baggage and freight.

The convention also allows simplified electronic records to be used for both freight and passenger transport and allows claims for damages in the case of death or injury to a passenger to be heard in Australia, rather than in a foreign court.

It is expected that the Montreal Convention will enter into force for Australia in the second half of 2008.

Cooperation

In 2007-08, the Department continued to ensure that Australia participated effectively in the development of international air transport regulation, including by:

  • coordinating the whole-of-government response to international regulatory issues in aviation;
  • maintaining an office in Montreal, Canada, to provide a permanent headquarters for Australian participation on the ICAO Council and the ICAO Air Navigation Commission; and
  • representing Australia on the Council of the Pacific Aviation Safety Office, and providing practical assistance to the office.

The Department was also active in efforts to advance consideration of the issues surrounding aviation emissions and their contribution to global warming. The Department led the conduct of two Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) seminars which brought together industry and economy representatives to share information and options for collective work (refer Case Study: 'APEC Aviation Emissions Taskforce' page 147). The Department was also an active member of the special high-level group established by ICAO, which is to report in late 2009.

Assistance

The Department took part in Australian Government projects to assist Australia's near neighbours to improve the effectiveness of their air transport regulation. This included providing administrative assistance to Papua New Guinea's Civil Aviation Authority, through the Australian Government's Strongim Gavman Program (formerly known as the Enhanced Cooperation Program).

The Australian Government's Indonesia Transport Safety Assistance Package (ITSAP) was announced in May 2007. The assistance commenced in July 2007 and was formalised in a memorandum of understanding signed by Australia and Indonesia on 31 January 2008.

The ITSAP program involves Airservices Australia, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority and the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, and provides technical and training assistance to support Indonesia in addressing aviation and maritime transport safety challenges. Significant outcomes during 2007-08 include two ICAO standard crash investigation reports, four rounds of airworthiness inspector training, extensive search and rescue cooperation, and Air Traffic Management Systems/Safety Management Systems development in eastern Indonesia.

Businesses and consumers have access to competitive international and domestic air services.

General Aviation Industry Action Agenda

Following 12 months of consultation and analysis, supported by a departmental secretariat, the Strategic Industry Leaders Group of the General Aviation Industry Action Agenda presented its final report in May 2008. The group's findings will be considered by the government in the context of the comprehensive review of aviation policy that commenced in April 2008.

Introduction of the Aviation Legislation Amendment (International Airline Licences and Carriers' Liability Insurance) Bill

The Department finalised the preparation of the Aviation Legislation Amendment (International Airline Licences and Carriers' Liability Insurance) Bill, which was introduced into parliament on 26 June 2008. The Bill updates two aviation regulatory programs: the system of airlines' mandatory liability insurance and the system of international airline licences.

If enacted, the Bill will strengthen CASA's administration of the airlines' mandatory liability scheme. This update will assist airlines by cutting red tape and removing unnecessary paperwork when dealing with insurance matters.

The Bill also improves the government's ability to audit international airline licences. These licences allow the government to ensure that international flights are conducted in accordance with Australia's air services agreements and arrangements. They also provide a final checking mechanism to make sure that safety, security and insurance approvals are in place before an airline commences international services.

International air services

Statistics from the Australian Bureau of Statistics indicate:

  • There were 23.4 million passenger movements into and out of Australia in the year ending May 2008, representing a 5.8 per cent increase in traffic when compared to the previous 12 months.
  • New Zealand was the largest origin/destination (O/D) market, with a total of 4.1 million passenger movements, an increase of 3.9 per cent compared to the previous year. The other markets in the top five were the United Kingdom, the United States of America, China and Japan.
  • Of the top 20 O/D markets, growth in passenger movements was highest for Indonesia (32.8 per cent), followed by France (20.5 per cent), Thailand (19.8 per cent), India (18.9 per cent) and Vietnam (17.3 per cent).
  • There were 5.6 million short-term visitor arrivals into Australia during the year ending May 2008, an increase of 0.4 per cent over the number of visitors in the previous 12 months.
  • There were 5.7 million short-term resident departures during the year ending May 2008, an increase of 11.3 per cent over the number of resident departures in the previous 12 months.

International agreements

The Department conducted air services consultations with 10 of Australia's bilateral aviation partners - Brunei Darussalam, France (French Polynesia), Kenya, Malaysia, Mauritius, Pakistan, the Republic of Korea, Solomon Islands, South Africa and the United States of America - resulting in new air services agreements and/or arrangements with nine. Consultations with French Polynesia did not alter existing capacity or other entitlements; however, the delegations will meet again to discuss outstanding issues. Any new treaties settled will be referred to the respective governments for consideration before they are brought into legal force.

New or additional entitlements to operate air services between and/or beyond Australia and the other nine bilateral partners were settled by way of these consultations. These entitlements become available for use by the relevant airlines immediately.

The inaugural aviation arrangements with Kenya will provide a framework for the development of air services between Australia and Kenya, although services provided by way of cooperative marketing are likely in the first instance.

Increases in capacity entitlements settled with South Africa will provide opportunities for carriers of both countries to expand existing services and for additional airlines to enter the Australia-South Africa market, providing competition for the incumbent carriers on the route.

Consultations with the United States of America in February 2008 resulted in a landmark 'open skies' agreement, signed on 31 March 2008.

Prime Minister Rudd with the United States Secretary of Transportation, Ms Mary Peters, signing the 'Open Skies' Air Transport Agreement in Washington DC on 31 March 2008

Prime Minister Rudd with the United States Secretary of Transportation, Ms Mary Peters, signing the 'Open Skies' Air Transport Agreement in Washington DC on 31 March 2008 (Photo: David Foote - AUSPIC)

Businesses and consumers have access to competitive international and domestic air services (continued).

 

Australian and United States of America airlines will now be able to determine the frequency of their air services and the routes they wish to serve, whether direct or via other countries, without restriction on the number of passengers carried, or other restrictions on rights to carry passengers or cargo. Airlines will be able to establish fares based on commercial considerations in the marketplace.

An immediate outcome was the removal of an effective limitation of four services a week for new entrants, enabling Australian carrier V Australia to proceed with its plans to introduce air services between Australia and the United States of America.

Australia also made a significant breakthrough in strengthening aviation relations with the European Union, Australia's largest aviation market, in 2007-08. In April 2008, the Australian Government signed the Agreement between the Government of Australia and The European Community on certain aspects of Air Services - also known as the Horizontal Agreement. The Horizontal Agreement recognises the existence of a single European market for air transport links to and from Australia.

Building on this agreement, in June 2008 Australia and the European Union commenced negotiations for a comprehensive air services agreement. This Europe-wide agreement will seek to remove many - if not all - of the limitations on air services between Australia and the European Union. It is anticipated that it will also address issues around competition, protection of the environment, safety and security.

International airline timetable and licence approvals

The Department continued to regulate scheduled international air services in accordance with the requirements of the Air Navigation Act 1920 and associated Regulations. The Department approved 238 timetable approvals, 243 timetable variations, 17 non-scheduled flight approvals and four applications for international airline licences in 2007-08.

Domestic air services

The Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics reported more than 47 million domestic air passengers in 2007, an increase of 6.5 per cent compared to 2006.

The deregulated market, in which the Australian Government regulates safety and security but allows airlines to make commercial decisions about the routes they operate, delivers options and affordable air fares for both Australian residents and visiting overseas tourists, while maintaining safety and security. The Department continued to provide policy advice to government on the deregulated domestic market throughout 2007-08.

The Australian Government's policy of allowing 100 per cent foreign ownership of domestic airlines permitted Tiger Airways Australia's entry to the Australian domestic market in November 2007, contributing to competition in domestic air services.

Airspace is managed efficiently within international standards.

Review of the Australian Airspace Policy Statement

The Department provided policy advice to the government on the Australian Airspace Policy Statement (AAPS), which came into effect in July 2007. The statement provides guidance to CASA, as the airspace regulator, on the administration of airspace as a national resource. CASA developed a work program for the Office of Airspace Regulation for 2007-08, which included the priorities outlined in the policy statement. The statement is available on the Department's website.

The Department has initiated a review of the statement which will be completed by the end of 2008, in consultation with CASA, Airservices Australia, the Department of Defence and the aviation industry.

Review of the National Airspace System Stage 2C

In May 2008, the Department and CASA jointly responded to the recommendations of the post-implementation review of the new operating procedures at non-towered aerodromes.

The independent review was undertaken by consultants engaged by the Department, following discussions with a wide cross-section of the industry and Australian Government agencies. Based on assessment of a full year of operations under the new procedures, the consultants concluded that the procedures had a good safety record, but recommended a series of changes to maintain and improve on that record.

The joint Department-CASA response to the recommendations includes proposed changes to radio call requirements at non-towered aerodromes.

Did you know

Convention on International Civil Aviation
The number of times airlines can fly between Australia, and currently 68 other countries, is governed by a complex set of bilateral arrangements in place between Australia and these other countries. The majority of these bilateral air services arrangements are treaties and associated commercial arrangements negotiated on a regular basis under the umbrella of the Convention on International Civil Aviation, opened for signature at Chicago on December 7 1944.

Airspace is managed efficiently within international standards (continued).

Ongoing coordination of aviation policy

Four Australian Government agencies are involved in aviation policy, regulation and service provision - the Department, Airservices Australia, CASA and the Royal Australian Air Force.

The Aviation Policy Group (APG) continued to provide a senior-level forum to build better working relationships, develop strategic directions for aviation, and coordinate action across the four agencies in 2007-08.

The Secretary of the Department chairs APG, which has as its membership the Chief Executive Officers of CASA and Airservices Australia and the Chief of Air Force. APG collectively addresses broad aviation policy issues, while each agency retains individual authority and accountability for its own functions.

The Aviation Implementation Group was responsible for carrying forward a work program identified by APG, and identifying cross agency issues for APG's consideration. The group's members are senior officers from the Department (which chairs the group) and the other three Australian Government aviation agencies.

Strategic investment in new technologies

The Department, Airservices Australia, CASA and the Department of Defence released a joint consultation paper for industry comment in August 2007. The consultation paper proposed the wider application of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADSB) for navigation and surveillance in Australian airspace.

Close to 250 submissions were made by industry in response to the consultation paper. The agencies are jointly working through issues raised in submissions, as a basis for informing future Australian Government consideration of this matter. The strategic objective is investment in air navigation and surveillance infrastructure which:

  • underpins improvements in aviation safety;
  • delivers efficiency, environmental and operational benefits; and
  • ensures continued international harmonisation of aviation operations.

Australian Government investments in transport infrastructure are managed responsibly.

Airports Act amendments

The Department is responsible for administering the Airports Act 1996 (Airports Act) and associated Regulations which regulate the 22 leased federal airports.

The Airports Act was amended in May 2007 to provide a package of measures to fine-tune the regulatory scheme in the light of experience during its first 10 years of operation.

The amendments included introducing a stop-the-clock mechanism; aligning the planning requirements for Canberra Airport with those of the other airports; changing consultation obligations; giving greater clarity to the conditions that the Minister may attach to major development plans; and including land clearing as a building activity that requires approval.

Stop-the-clock provisions

The new 'stop-the clock' provisions in the Airports Act enable the Minister to suspend the assessment period for development proposals to allow adequate time for the Minister to obtain additional information, facilitating better informed decisions. During 2007-08 the mechanism was applied in the consideration of three airport planning proposals:

  • Essendon Airport - a late public submission concerning the draft master plan was received and the assessment period was suspended under section 80A of the Airports Act to allow the airport to respond;
  • Hobart Airport - the Minister applied the mechanism under section 93A of the Airports Act to request additional information to assist in the assessment of a draft major development plan for a direct factory outlet; and
  • Canberra Airport - the Minister applied the mechanism under section 93A of the Airports Act to request additional information to assist in the assessment of a draft major development plan for an office building at 15 Lancaster Place.

Changes to planning control at Canberra Airport

As a consequence of the May 2007 amendments to the Airports Act, developments at Canberra Airport are no longer subject to the National Capital Plan; this is consistent with planning controls in place at the other leased federal airports.

Conditions on major development plan

The May 2007 amendments to the Airports Act give greater clarity as to the types of conditions that may be attached to the approval of major development plans, by specifically allowing the inclusion of conditions that relate to the ongoing operation of the development that the plan relates to.

Changes to consultation

New provisions in the Airports Act impose an obligation upon the airports to give written notice of key planning proposals (master plans, major development plans and minor variations thereof) to the Minister, state and territory governments, and local government authorities with responsibility for town planning and land use outside the airports, before embarking on the formal public consultation process. The new provisions ensure off-airport planning authorities have sufficient notice and opportunity to provide informed input.

Land clearing permits

As a consequence of the May 2007 amendments to the Airports Act, land clearing on the leased federal airports requires approval. Permits for land clearing are granted under section 99 of the Airports Act. This process is being managed by the Airport Building Controllers in consultation with Airport Environment Officers. Guidelines have been prepared by the Department and distributed to all leased federal airports.

Management of federal airport leases

Between 1997 and 2003, 22 federal airports were privatised, via long-term leases: 50 years with an option to renew for a future 49 years (with the exception of Hoxton Park).

The lease granted over Hoxton Park Airport expires on 27 October 2008 (with an option to extend to 2010), after which it converts to freehold title. The airport-lessee company has confirmed the airport will cease operation as an airport effective on 28 October 2008.

The Department is responsible for monitoring compliance with the airport leases and Airports Act. Details of the Department's airport regulation program are in Appendix I.

Planning approvals

Under the Airports Act, a master plan must be prepared for every airport except for Mt Isa and Tennant Creek airports. The master plan represents the airport-lessee company's planning and development vision for the airport over a 20-year period. The master plan is submitted to the Minister for approval and reviewed every five years.

In addition to master plans, a major development plan is required for each major development. Section 89 of the Airports Act defines major developments and includes generally any significant building work or any development with a significant environmental impact on the airport site.

Master plans and major development plans are prepared by the airport-lessee company and the public must be consulted prior to submission to the Minister for consideration. The Minister may approve or refuse to approve any proposal.

The Department retains external specialist advice to assist in the assessment of complicated development proposals. For example, the Department has engaged the services of a specialist company with expertise in industrial emissions monitoring to advise the Department on compliance with conditions imposed on the approval for the construction and operation of a brickworks on the Perth Airport site. The conditions impose strict limitations on the emission of pollutants.

The Department also works closely with other Australian Government agencies in assessing large development proposals. Brisbane Airport's proposal to build a second runway required both a major development plan under the Airports Act and an environment impact statement under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, because it had significant environmental impact. The Department worked with Brisbane Airport and the Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, to develop documentation to facilitate the submission of a joint environment impact statement and major development plan for the project. The major development plan was approved by the Minister, with 26 conditions, in September 2007. These conditions aligned where possible with the conditions attached to the approved environment impact assessment.

In 2007-08, the Department provided assessments to the Minister on:

  • one airport master plan;
  • two minor variations to a master plan;
  • nine major development plans; and
  • one minor variation to a major development plan.

Lease compliance reviews

The Department conducts annual lease reviews of the 22 leased federal airports to ensure compliance with the terms of their leases.

Separately, the airport leases and original sale documents require that the airports insure against a number of events. The Department assesses the adequacy of airport insurance cover each year with the assistance of a contracted insurance advisor.

Details of the airport lease review meetings and the insurance review meetings in 2007-08 are in Appendix I.

Environmental management and building control

Management of the environment at the airport site is the responsibility of the airport-lessee companies. Through the Airports Act and the Airports (Environment Protection) Regulations 1997, the Department monitors compliance and regulates activities on the airports that may have environmental impacts.

Airport Environmental Officers (AEOs) and Airport Building Controllers (ABCs) at the leased airports help the Department to monitor and ensure compliance with environmental and building standards. The AEO is a statutory officer appointed by the Secretary to administer the Airports (Environment Protection) Regulations 1997. The ABC has responsibility for approving all building activities on an airport site. The ABC works closely with the AEO to ensure that any environmental and heritage issues are reflected in conditions attached to a building permit.

All airports other than Mt Isa and Tennant Creek must complete an Airport Environment Strategy (AES) which advocates continuous environmental improvement. An AES is normally in force for five years from the date of its approval by the Minister. The draft AES is prepared by an airport-lessee company after taking into account public comments.

Authorisations issued under the Airports (Environment Protection) Regulations 1997

The Department may authorise an airport to undertake an action that may result in environmental emission limits being exceeded where the emissions will be no more damaging to the environment than if the limits were met.

The authorisation allows for transitional arrangements while methods of achieving compliance with the limits are investigated and implemented.

No authorisations were issued during 2007-08.

Monitoring of compliance with aeronautical infrastructure obligations

The sale agreements for 10 of the 22 leased federal airports (Adelaide, Alice Springs, Brisbane, Canberra, Gold Coast, Darwin, Hobart, Launceston, Melbourne and Perth airports) included binding aeronautical infrastructure development obligations to be completed during the first 10 years of their leases.

The Department has monitored the progress of the obligations since their inception (Table 4.25 outlines this expenditure).

Airport price regulation

A new price monitoring regime at the five major airports (Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne (Tullamarine), Perth and Sydney (Kingsford Smith) airports) commenced on 1 July 2007, in response to the Productivity Commission's report Review of Price Regulation of Airport Services. Implementation of this regime included the exclusion of Canberra and Darwin airports from the price monitoring regime and amendment of the Airports Regulations 1997 to expand the definition of aeronautical services and facilities.

The range of airport services monitored by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) was broadened in 2007-08, to include short-term and long-term car-parking services at the major airports. Changes to quality of service monitoring are also being developed.

Table 4.25 Airport development expenditure at major airports ($m)

Airport Sale
phasea
Spending to
30 June
2006
Spending to
30 June
2007
Spending
to 30 June
2008
Period 1
obligationb
Period 2
obligationc
Commitment
met?
Adelaide 2 72.3 72.3 72.3 41.4 22.6 Yes
Alice Springs 2 2.7 6.2 6.2 1.2 1.9 Yes
Brisbane 1 223.9 363.8 363.8 44.4 292.9 Yes
Canberra 2 51.3 65.5 73.7 11.0 46.9 Yes
Gold Coast 2 28.4 55.4 55.4 19.2 8.5 Yes
Darwin 2 21.6 21.6 21.6 3.3 2.7 Yes
Hobart 2 7.8 7.8 7.8 3.8 1.7 Yes
Launceston 2 3.5 3.5 3.5 2.2 0.9 Yes
Melbourne 1 107.8 107.8 107.8 78.3 29.0 Yes
Perth 1 111.3 111.3 111.3 54.6 33.3 Yes
Total   630.6 815.2 823.4 259.4 440.4  

a Phase 1 was completed in 1997 and Phase 2 in 1998. The date of sale affects the deadline for completion of Period One obligations.
b Period 1 commitment is in line with Schedule 11 of each sale agreement.
c Period 2 commitment is in line with Schedule 11 of each sale agreement. No extensions to Period 2 have been granted to date.

Australian Government investments in transport infrastructure are managed responsibly (continued).

Slot management at Sydney Airport

The Sydney Airport Demand Management Act 1997 (Demand Management Act) is the statutory framework for demand management at the airport. The Demand Management Act specifies a limit of 80 aircraft movements per hour at Sydney Airport through a slot management regime.

In its report Implementation of the Sydney Airport Demand Management Act 1997 (No. 29 of 2006-07), the Australian National Audit Office noted a disparity between the definition of a 'slot' under the Demand Management Act and the practical interpretation of a slot. This defect was addressed through the Sydney Airport Demand Management Amendment Act 2008, which was enacted in July 2008.

The amendment Act changes the definition of a 'slot' from an aircraft or runway movement to a gate movement, in line with international practice. Other amendments include:

  • providing the Minister with an ability to vary the compliance scheme in exceptional circumstances;
  • clarifying that a 'movement in an emergency' included the aircraft returning to its base of operations in Sydney;
  • applying provisions of the Demand Management Act to some movements during the curfew;
  • expanding the Minister's power to delegate to include the power to appoint members of the Compliance Committee; and
  • increasing the upper limit for penalties that can be prescribed by regulations to 50 penalty units.

The Department is developing consequential amendments to the Sydney Airport Demand Management Regulations 1998 and the slot management and compliance schemes.

The objectives of the slot management regime at Sydney Airport are to:

  • provide an effective means of administering the movement limit;
  • alleviate delays caused by congestion;
  • safeguard access for regional airlines;
  • provide equal access to slots for new entrants; and
  • spread aircraft movements more evenly within hours.

Effective administration

Airservices Australia is responsible for monitoring compliance with the aircraft movement limit and reporting to Parliament. There were no reported breaches of the movement limit in 2007-08.

Responsibility for the day-to-day administration and management of the slot management scheme rests with the slot manager, currently an independent non-profit company, Airport Coordination Australia (ACA). The amendment Act includes a measure formalising the requirement that the slot manager consider the movement cap in the allocation of slots.

Slots are allocated for periods based on seasons in the northern hemisphere, for consistency with international practice: 'summer' is April to October, and 'winter' is November to March. The Department examined slot allocation reports for the Winter 07 (28 October 2007 to 29 March 2008) and Summer 07 (30 March to 25 October 2008) scheduling seasons. The reports indicate that, for the last two scheduling seasons, pressure points in the morning and evening peaks arose from runway and apron availability rather than slot availability.

Primary responsibility for monitoring compliance with allocated slots rests with the Sydney Airport Compliance Committee, pursuant to the Sydney Airport Compliance Scheme. In six meetings held during 2007-08, the committee, chaired by the Department, considered actual movements against allocated slots and the reasons given for any early or delayed movements. The committee has the power to declare a movement taken not to be off-slot if it considers the circumstances that caused the delay (or early arrival) were beyond the operator's control. This is a routine function of the committee under the Compliance Scheme to determine whether a movement should be subject to a penalty.

Reduced delays

The committee found that, even though there were aircraft movements that operated early or were delayed beyond the permitted tolerance limits (15 minutes for flights shorter than three hours and 30 minutes for flights longer than three hours), less than 20 per cent of these movements were for reasons within the operator's control. All flights that operated into and out of Sydney Airport were allocated slots beforehand.

No infringement notices or penalties were issued in 2007-08.

Figure 4.4 shows on-time performance statistics for Sydney Airport for each scheduling period, from the commencement of the demand management arrangements in 1998 to 2007.

Figure 4.4 On-time performance of all services, Sydney Airport, 1998 to 2007

Figure 4.4 On-time performance of all services, Sydney Airport, 1998 to 2007

S = summer period (April-October), W = winter period (November-March)

Note: The graph shows on-time performance as arrivals and departures within 15 minutes of the scheduled time; however, the graph does not account for delay factors that are outside of the operator's control (e.g. weather, air traffic control and increased security measures) which are assessed by the committee.

Source: Airport Coordination Australia.

Australian Government investments in transport infrastructure are managed responsibly (continued).

Equitable access

Figure 4.5 shows the effect of the management scheme on slot access, by contrasting slot allocation in 1998 to allocation in 2007-08. The graph shows the seasonal distribution of international, domestic (interstate) and regional (intrastate New South Wales) and protected slots.

The slot management scheme includes specific conditions relating to the allocation of slots to regional service operators and new entrants to the Sydney route. These measures guarantee equitable access to Sydney Airport for operators of regional services and new entrants to the Sydney route.

Following the collapse of Ansett Airlines and its subsidiaries in September 2001, the then Minister issued a direction to the slot manager to ensure that the slot regime continued to maximise the efficient use of the Sydney Airport infrastructure while avoiding the possibility of creating an anticompetitive outcome. Under the direction, all airlines can have access to the Ansett slots in accordance with the slot allocation process but only new entrant airlines can gain historical precedence (or permanent access) to them.

Figure 4.5 Average weekly runway movements, allocated and available, by type of service, Sydney Airport

S = summer period (April-October), W = winter period (November-March)

Source: Airport Coordination Australia.

 

Even distribution of aircraft movements

The spread of aircraft movements across the busiest operational hours at Sydney Airport is shown in Figures 4.6 and 4.7.

Overall, demand for slots in Winter 07 was close to 78 movements per hour in the weekday morning peak and exceeded 75 movements per hour in the weekday evening peak. In the Summer 07 season, overall demand was close to 75 movements per hour in the weekday morning peak and exceeded 70 movements per hour in the weekday evening peak (Friday demand exceeded 75 movements per hour).

The slot management scheme facilitates an even distribution of aircraft movements by controlling movements in 60-minute periods commencing every 15 minutes, minimising congestion problems associated with cluster scheduling. The total number of possible movements per week is 80 movements per hour over 17 regulated hours per day within a seven-day week.

Movements are increasing in the off-peak hours, due mainly to growth in the use of domestic slots (low-cost carriers).

Figure 4.6 Distribution of aircraft movements within the morning peak hours on a Monday in the summer 2007 slot allocation period, Sydney Airport

Figure 4.6	Distribution of aircraft movements within the morning peak hours on a Monday in the summer 2007 slot allocation period, Sydney Airport

Source: Airport Coordination Australia

Figure 4.7 Distribution of aircraft movements within the evening peak hours on a Friday in the summer 2007 slot allocation period, Sydney Airport

Figure 4.7	Distribution of aircraft movements within the evening peak hours on a Friday in the summer 2007 slot allocation period, Sydney Airport

Source: Airport Coordination Australia

Australian Government investments in transport infrastructure are managed responsibly (continued).

Grant to the Central Australian Tourism Industry Association

In 2006-07, the Australian Government contributed $191,200 to the Central Australian Tourism Industry Association for the purchase of security screening equipment and an aircraft tug for use at Alice Springs Airport. The Central Australian Tourism Industry Association has used the funds and will provide an audited report to the Department in 2008-09.

Community exposure to aircraft noise is minimised with attention to the needs of specific communities.

 

Noise amelioration programs

In 2007-08, the Department continued to assist Adelaide Airport and Sydney Airport and local communities to work together to minimise the impacts of aircraft noise.

The noise amelioration programs for both airports are being wound down after having proven to be an effective tool to reduce the impacts of aircraft noise for residents living under busy flight paths. Ongoing management of warranty issues will continue in 2008-09 and the Department will continue to monitor the noise contours in Sydney and Adelaide on an annual basis.

Aircraft noise levy

Recovery of costs associated with the noise amelioration programs is undertaken through a levy on jet aircraft landings at the respective airports and implemented by the Aircraft Noise Levy Act 1995. Airservices Australia is authorised to collect the levy on behalf of the Department.

Receipts totalling $7.9 million collected under the Aircraft Noise Levy Collection Act 1995 are reported in the Department's audited financial statements as required by the Act.

The levy at Sydney Airport ceased on 1 July 2006. The levy at Adelaide Airport will continue, according to the provisions of the Act.

Sydney Airport Community Forum

The Department continued to provide secretariat support to the Sydney Airport Community Forum. The forum is a consultative committee composed of federal, state and local government and community representatives, which liaises with Sydney Airport, industry and the Australian Government on aircraft noise issues affecting the community.

Curfews

To minimise the impact of night-time noise on nearby communities, restrictions on aircraft movements are applied, through legislated curfews, at the Adelaide, Essendon, Gold Coast and Sydney airports. The curfews, which operate between the hours of 11 pm and 6 am, limit the number and type of aircraft that can be operated and stipulate which runways can be used.

In 2007-08, the Department:

  • assessed 124 applications for curfew dispensation - 16 for Adelaide, 13 for Gold Coast (Coolangatta) and 95 for Sydney; and
  • approved 71 curfew dispensations - eight for Adelaide, six for Gold Coast and 57 for Sydney.

Aircraft noise and emissions software

In response to feedback from clients, in 2007-08 the Department continued to refine the Transparent Noise Information Package (TNIP) software that it has developed. Work also commenced on a TNIP Carbon Counter module for the software.

The noise modules of the software are designed as a tool to enable the non-specialist to gain a better understanding of aircraft noise exposure patterns. They enable airports and the public to work together to develop options for mitigating the impacts of aircraft noise on the community.

The Carbon Counter module has been developed to calculate the engine emissions produced by an individual aircraft over the course of a specified journey and, consequently, the carbon footprint of the aircraft.

The TNIP software is available on the Department's website.

International cooperation

The Department continued in its participation in international forums which address the problems of aircraft noise, such as ICAO's Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection and APEC's Transportation Working Group.

Table 4.26 Trends in aviation and airports

  2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
Price of output $21.8m $27.2m $28.7m $33.6m
Activity regulated under the Air Navigation Act 1920
Aircraft noise permits issued 48 31 28 25
Activity regulated under the Airports Act 1996
Airport master plans approved 13 2 1 1
Variations to master plans approved 0 1 1 2
Airport environment strategies approved 18 1 0 0
Major development plans approved 7 5 9 8
Major development plans not approved 0 0 1 0
Variations to major development plans 1 2 0 2
Decisions made on development proposals infringing on federal airspace 18 34 36 39
Administered programs
Payments to airport lessees
Parking fines $1.7m $0.9m $1.6m $0.8m
Sale of airport land 0 0 0 $10.2m
Land acquisition $3.4m 0 0 0
Payments for Airservices Australia's en route charges
Operators supported 41 35 31 29
Cost of program $4.7m $6.0m $6.0m $5.8m
Cost of other programs administered, including contribution to ICAO and airport noise programs $18.6m $16.8m $7.4m $5.2m

Purchaser - provider arrangements - Output 2.3.3

The Department has agency agreements with CASA, AirServices Australia and the Australian Maritime Safety Authority to cover the provision of transport safety assistance to Indonesia. In 2007-08 the following appropriated funds were provided to agencies for this purpose: $2,069,694 (CASA), $2,612,115 (Air Services Australia); and $787,691 (AMSA). As outlined in the agency agreements the agencies report to the Department against an agreed set of key performance indicators on a quarterly basis. All key performance indicators are being met through projects delivered by the agencies.

Administered programs for Output 2.3.3 - Aviation and airports policy, programs and regulation

Table 4.27 Summary of performance - Airport Lessee Companies - reimbursement of parking fines

Performance indicators Results
Quality

Revenue is passed on to airport lessees in line with a formula set by the Minister for Finance and Deregulation.

The program reimburses the lessees of eight leased federal airports a proportion of the revenue collected as fines for parking offences in airport precincts. Reimbursements are made in accordance with contracts between airport lessees and the Department.

The Airports (Control of On-Airport Activities) Regulations 1997 require the eight participating airport lessees to have in place a Parking Signage Plan (PSP) and Standard Operating Procedures for the airport site. Any conduct of driving or parking in contravention of the PSP is an infringement notice offence.

The total amount of revenue collected by the airports and remitted to the Commonwealth fluctuates from year to year depending upon the number of infringement notices issued by the airport lessees.

The Department makes quarterly payments to airport lessees in line with a formula set by the Minister for Finance and Deregulation: namely, 80 per cent of the revenue from parking fines for the quarter collected by the airport and forwarded to the Department, less administrative costs.

Location

Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, Gold Coast, Townsville, Hobart and Launceston airports.

The lessees of these eight leased federal airports are covered by the program.

Cost

$1.5 million

The actual cost of this program in 2007-08 was $0.8 million.

The value of the reimbursements and hence the cost of the program is driven by the number and dollar amount of fines collected by the participating airports.

Overall performance Fully achieved.

Table 4.28 Summary of performance - Compensation for the sale of airport land

Performance indicators Results
Quality

Airport lessees receive appropriate compensation for the sale of small portions of airport land not essential for airport operation.

From time to time the Australian Government adds or removes airport land, with the consent of the airport lessee, to facilitate on-airport or off-airport development. The Department administers compensation to airport-lessee companies after an appropriate price is agreed with parties including the Department of Finance and Deregulation.

The program allows the excision of small portions of land not essential for aeronautical activities, with the lessee's consent and for reasonable compensation.

Location

Tugan Bypass, Gold Coast Airport.

During 2007-08, the Department was involved in the following land transfers:

  • a portion of land was transferred from the Parafield Airport lease site to the South Australian Government for the construction of part of Elder Smith Road (also known as the Mawson Connector); and
  • a portion of land was transferred to the Queensland Government for the construction of the Tugun Bypass.
Cost

$9.8 million

The actual cost of this program in 2007-08 was nil as the compensation costs ($10.2 million) were fully offset against the sale proceeds associated with the land. The compensation cost estimate was exceeded because the cost of the Parafield Airport land transfer was not included in the forecast for 2007-08.

Overall performance Fully achieved.

Table 4.29 Summary of performance - Implementation of noise amelioration

Performance indicators Results
Effectiveness

Community exposure to aircraft noise is ameliorated in eligible buildings.

Airport noise amelioration programs were introduced in Sydney in November 1994 and in Adelaide in May 2000. Under both programs, the Australian Government offered homeowners financial assistance to install noise insulation for eligible residences under major flight paths. The government also provided for the insulation of public buildings such as schools and colleges, preschools, health and aged care facilities and churches.

The Aircraft Noise Levy which funded the programs ceased at Sydney Airport on 1 July 2006. The levy at Adelaide Airport continues, in accordance with the provisions of the Aircraft Noise Levy Collection Act 1995.

All eligible residences and public buildings have been identified and, where the offer was accepted, insulated. Only 12-month warranty period obligations remain to be finalised.

The programs have effectively reduced the impact of aircraft noise on homes and public buildings under flight paths.

Information on aircraft noise and flight path monitoring at major airports is available on the Airservices Australia website www.airservicesaustralia.com

Quality

Work is carried out by qualified professionals and is rated as good or better by 80% of building owners.

Work has been completed at all residences and public buildings where owners/occupants accepted an offer of insulation. To gain feedback on the level of workmanship and service provided, clients were provided with a survey form on completion of their work. More than 80% of clients who participated consistently rated the quality of work done as very good or better.

Quantity

Approximately 4,700 eligible homes and 100 eligible public buildings are insulated from aircraft noise.

As of June 2008, a total of 4,700 residential dwellings and 100 public buildings in eligible noise contours of Sydney and Adelaide had been insulated.

Location

Adelaide, Sydney.

The programs were administered in Adelaide and Sydney.

Cost

$0.9 million

The actual cost of this program in 2007-08 was $0.8 million.

Overall performance Fully achieved.

Table 4.30 Trends in aircraft noise amelioration

  2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
Adelaide Airport
Private homes insulated 208 240 4 0 0 0
Public buildings insulated 2 1 2 1 1 0
Work rated very good or better by clients 88% 83% 100% n/a n/a n/a
Cost of works to government $13.2m $13.9m $7.6m $1.3m $1.9m $0.4m
Sydney Airport
Private homes insulated 113 12 12 0 0 0
Public buildings insulated 2 1 3 2 1 0
Work rated very good or better by clients >80% 82% 100% n/a n/a n/a
Cost of works to government $7.7m $3.9m $6.2m $3.3m $1.9m $0.4m

Table 4.31 Summary of performance - Payment scheme for Airservices Australia's en route charges

Performance indicators Results
Effectiveness

Costs are reduced for airlines providing eligible regular public transport and/or aeromedical services.

The program helps airline operators to provide services to regional communities by reimbursing them for Airservices Australia's en route air traffic control charges. The Department administers a subsidy that assists small regional airlines to fly to more destinations and makes airfares in regional Australia more affordable. The subsidy also helps support aeromedical operators such as the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS).

The subsidy is available to regular public transport operators that use aircraft with a maximum take-off weight of 15 tonnes or less, as well as aeromedical operators.

In Western Australia, the subsidy is also available to regular public transport operators that use aircraft with a take-off weight between 15 tonnes and 21 tonnes, because the state's enormous distances require the use of larger aircraft.

Quality

Claims from airlines are processed efficiently and accurately.

The turnaround time for payment of invoices is seven days from receipt of all information required to process the claim. Payment runs for the Department occur weekly.

No complaints were received from recipient operators during 2007-08.

Quantity

Approximately 36 operators are reimbursed for Airservices Australia's en route air traffic control charges.

The program is demand driven. The number of airlines seeking reimbursement during 2007-08 was 29.

Cost

$6.0 million

The actual cost of this program in 2007-08 was $5.8 million.

Overall performance Fully achieved.

Table 4.32 Summary of performance - Remote Aerodrome Safety Program

Performance indicators Results
Effectiveness

Access to essential services for remote communities is improved.

The Remote Aerodrome Safety Program (RASP) assisted in funding the upgrade of airstrips in remote and isolated communities across Australia. Projects funded under the program helped improve the accessibility of airstrips and facilitated the provision of non-commercial essential community air services. These services included the delivery of food supplies, community mail, passenger transport services, medical supplies and medical care such as that provided by the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS).

Aviation safety at remote airstrips is improved.

Aerodrome improvements funded under the program included safety measures such as:

  • fencing to reduce the risk from animal incursions;
  • improved runway lighting;
  • runway resealing and surface repairs; and
  • the provision of safety-related training or manuals for key operational staff.

The capacity of the Royal Flying Doctor Service to provide its services is enhanced.

Many of the projects supported under the program were identified as priorities by the RFDS. These projects provided for improved safety and access for RFDS aircraft and pilots, and increased the organisation's capability to provide medical services both during the day and at night.

Quality

Grants are provided for projects that meet program guidelines.

A rigorous assessment process of all applications was undertaken by the RASP Assessment Panel. The panel is chaired by the Department and consists of representatives from other Australian Government agencies and, as appropriate, national stakeholder organisations such as the RFDS. The assessment process ensured that all approved projects complied with program guidelines.

Location

Eligible communities and airstrips across remote Australia.

A total of 25 projects in remote locations across the country were approved under the program in 2007-08. See map on following page.

Cost

$1.0 million

The actual cost of this program in 2007-08 was $0.7 million.

Overall performance Mostly achieved.

Note: This administered program, previously known as the Regional and Remote Airstrips Funding Scheme, was renamed in the 2007-08 PAES.

Figure 4.8 Round one of the Remote Aerodrome Safety Program funded 25 safety upgrade projects at 22 airstrips across Australia

Figure 4.8 Round one of the Remote Aerodrome Safety Program funded 25 safety upgrade projects at 22 airstrips across Australia

Table 4.33 Summary of performance - Sydney West Airport rental properties

Performance indicators Results
Effectiveness

The Australian Government meets its obligations as a landlord.

The Australian Government owns and leases out commercial and residential properties on a site at Badgerys Creek, New South Wales, originally acquired for a proposed second major airport for Sydney.

The Department administered the leases during 2007-08 to ensure the Australian Government met its obligations as a landlord. This included authorising maintenance (such as kitchen upgrades and electrical, roofing and plumbing repairs) to ensure properties remain in reasonable condition; and paying water and land rates.

Quantity/Location

Approximately 254 commercial and residential properties are maintained at the Sydney West Airport site (Badgerys Creek).

All commercial and residential properties were maintained.

Cost

$2.8 million

The actual cost of this program in 2007-08 was $2.2 million.

Overall performance Fully achieved.

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