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Report on performance

Outcome 2-Transport Outputs and Programs

Output 2.2.1-Transport security policy, programs and regulation

Highlights

The Regulated Air Cargo Agent Security Training Framework became operational from 1 January 2008, introducing a range of improved security competency standards for the air cargo sector.

The introduction of explosive trace detection (ETD) equipment by the major international and domestic air cargo terminal operators was completed in June 2008. In addition, the Office of Transport Security (OTS) conducted comprehensive air cargo X-ray trials designed to analyse the capability of current X-ray technology in Australia and internationally.

The Maritime Security Risk Context Statement was developed and released to the industry. This document provides a new assessment of threat and risk in the maritime sector based on current intelligence.

Enhanced airside inspection measures were implemented at the 11 major Australian airports. These measures included: reducing the number of airside access points; undertaking checks of people, goods and vehicles at airside access points; and limiting access to airside areas through tenant facilities.

A comprehensive review of aviation security screening, to examine and improve the screening regime, commenced. The OTS expects to present the final report to the Minister in December 2008.

A risk-based, intelligence-led, national audit and compliance program was developed for 2008-09. The program identifies vulnerabilities in the aviation and maritime security environment, targeting areas of high risk.

The OTS Regulatory Philosophy and the OTS Strategic Plan 2007-2010 were developed to state clearly to industry, other stakeholders and staff how the OTS will regulate preventive security in the aviation, maritime and air cargo sectors of the transport industry.

The Oil and Gas Security Forum was established and met for the first time on 17 June 2008. The forum involves oil and gas industry participants as well as representatives from relevant Australian Government and state and territory government agencies who will work collaboratively on strategic security issues affecting this sector.

Phase 1 of the regional domestic checked baggage screening (CBS) initiative was completed, with random and continuous CBS through explosive trace detection equipment commencing at 29 regional airports across Australia from 1 December 2007.

The conduct of Australian Security Intelligence Organisation Protective Security Section (T4) vulnerability assessments commenced at the 11 major airports. The vulnerability assessments focused on three key areas of security at airports - front of house, perimeter security and access control to secure areas - in response to a recommendation made by Sir John Wheeler in his Independent Review of Aviation Security and Policing in Australia.

Overview

The Office of Transport Security (OTS) plays a key role in improving the security of aviation (including air cargo), maritime and offshore oil and gas industries and surface transport.

Based on a nationally consistent approach that complies with international standards, the OTS works with state and territory governments and the transport industry to improve security and to prevent transport security incidents through:

  • transport security intelligence and operations;
  • transport security policy, planning and regulation; and
  • audit and compliance activities.

The OTS also works with Australian intelligence and law enforcement agencies to provide advice to the Australian Government on achieving aviation and maritime security outcomes.

Output 2.2.1 is delivered by the OTS and the Office of the Inspector of Transport Security (OITS). In 2007-08, the output administered five programs:

  • Aviation security enhancements: checked baggage screening;
  • Aviation security enhancements: improving international aviation security;
  • Aviation security enhancements: increased air cargo inspections;
  • Aviation security enhancements: regional passenger screening; and
  • Aviation security enhancements: screening for liquids, aerosols and gels.

Output 2.2.1 corresponds to Output 1.2.1 in the previous outcome and output structure (see Appendix L for a comparison between the current and previous structures).

Table 4.4 summarises the output's performance in 2007-08.

Summary of performance

Table 4.4 Summary of performance - Output 2.2.1 - Transport security policy, programs and regulation

Performance indicators Results
Effectiveness

Transport security is maintained and enhanced.

The Office of Transport Security (OTS) continued to enhance Australia's policies for aviation security, regional aviation and air freight security, maritime security, offshore oil and gas security, critical infrastructure and surface transport security to create a transport system that is more secure against the threat of terrorism and unlawful acts.

Quality

Inquiries into major transport security incidents are undertaken as directed by the Minister.

The Inspector of Transport Security Act 2006 came into effect on 8 June 2007.

The inspector is currently undertaking an inquiry into the security arrangements for intrastate, privately operated, large commercial passenger ferries.

Advice to the Australian Government and industry reflects threat and risk assessment.

The OTS produced summary reports of maritime and aviation security events and incidents to assist in developing and implementing appropriate preventive security measures and priorities. The OTS also provided briefings and presentations in various forums as part of an ongoing stakeholder engagement process to keep industry, other government agencies and foreign partners informed of strategic transport security threats, risks and vulnerabilities.

Aviation and maritime security is regulated in line with relevant legislation and is enforced appropriately.

The Aviation Transport Security Amendment Act 2006, and the associated amendments to the Aviation Transport Security Regulations 2005 were introduced to ensure the legislation remains effective in an evolving security environment.

Regulations that took effect in October 2007 provide for the Accredited Air Cargo Agents (AACA) Scheme and for the introduction of explosive trace detection (ETD) equipment for the examination of air cargo.

No amendments were made to the maritime regulatory framework in 2007-08.

During 2007-08, the OTS developed the OTS Regulatory Philosophy and the OTS Strategic Plan 2007-2010. These documents were developed following consultation with key stakeholders, such as heads of federal agencies, regulatory academics, transport industry representatives, unions and staff.

A transport security inspector training needs analysis was completed and accepted during 2007-08. One recommendation of the analysis was that courses should be developed in conjunction with a registered training organisation.

The aviation and maritime industries are engaged in developing and implementing transport security priorities.

The OTS engaged in a number of industry forums during 2007-08. These included:

  • Aviation Security Advisory Forum;
  • Regional Industry Consultative Meeting;
  • Maritime Industry Security Consultative Forum;
  • Oil and Gas Security Forum;
  • Over the Horizon Roundtable; and
  • Transport Infrastructure Assurance Advisory Group

In consultation with industry, the OTS continued to enhance the security incident reporting system.

State and territory governments and industry are assisted to further enhance surface transport security.

The Transport Security Working Group helped state and territory governments to mitigate the risk of surface transport security incidents by developing nationally consistent surface transport security strategies and guideline materials.

Targeted countries in our region are assisted to improve their transport security capabilities.

The OTS participated in the International Counter Terrorism Coordination Group (ICTCG) led by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, which coordinates capacity building across agencies through the terrorism trilateral process that includes participation by Australia, Japan and the United States of America.

In 2007-08, trilateral meetings were held in Sydney and Tokyo.

The OTS continued to assist regional countries to improve their transport security capacity by providing policy advice, training and program development assistance.

Quality

Other governments and international organisations are engaged, so as to further Australian interests in the transport security sector.

International governments were engaged to promote awareness of, and compliance of security measures with, Australian requirements concerning the restrictions of liquids, aerosols and gels for inbound flights to Australia.

Transport security support to special events and counter-terrorism exercises are coordinated.

The OTS provided advice on transport security arrangements and supported the Australian Government's security preparations, counter-terrorism exercises, planning for and conduct of Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Leaders Week and the July 2008 World Youth Day program. The OTS coordinated departmental support for and participation in a National Counter-Terrorism Committee exercise program.

Government policy decisions on transport security are implemented on time and within budget.

At June 2008, there were 913 regulated air cargo agents (RACAs); 40 new RACA transport security plans were approved in 2007-08.

Implementation of enhanced airside inspection measures, such as: reducing the number of airside access points; undertaking checks of people, goods and vehicles at airside access points; and limiting access to airside areas through tenant facilities at designated airports, have been put in place at Australia's 11 major airports.

Quantity

Transport security, audit and compliance activity is conducted at/for approximately:

412 aviation industry participants covering 188 airports across Australia and 224 domestic and international airlines

10,000 general aviation aircraft on a risk assessed basis
approximately 850 regulated air cargo agents

264 maritime security plan holders covering 73 ports, 364 related facilities and 59 Australian flagged vessels, and

22 offshore oil and gas security plans covering 76 offshore service providers and offshore facilities.

The OTS conducted audit and compliance activities based on risk assessments of regulated participants. Current audit and compliance activities are undertaken in accordance with the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards.

In 2007-08, the OTS conducted 1,618 compliance activities in the aviation industry. These activities were focused on the compliance of Australia's major international airports, screened airports, international airlines, RACAs and major domestic airlines. Collectively these comprised over 80% of compliance activity.

In 2007-08, the OTS conducted 1,740 compliance activities in the maritime industry.

More than 11,000 foreign ships are risk-assessed and security inspections targeted as appropriate.

The OTS monitors all visits by foreign vessels. The OTS conducted 1,149 targeted inspections of foreign-flagged ships based on security compliance checks conducted on 12,084 foreign-regulated ships seeking entry to Australian ports

Aviation Security Identification Card - management of background checking of up to 93,000 aviation participants.

For the period from 1 July to 3 September 2007, the OTS assessed approximately 13,700 Aviation Security Identification Card (ASIC) applications. From this date, the responsibility for the background checking of ASIC and Maritime Security Identification Card (MSIC) applicants transferred to a centralised government vetting agency, AusCheck, a division of the Attorney-General's Department.

Maritime Security Identification Card - management of background checking of up to 82,000 people in the maritime industry.

For the period from 1 July to 3 September 2007, the OTS assessed approximately 4,500 MSIC applications.

Price

$80.3 million

The actual price of this output in 2007-08 was $77.5 million.

Overall performance Mostly achieved.

Detailed report on performance

Effectiveness - Output 2.2.1

Transport security is maintained and enhanced.

The OTS contributes to the wellbeing of all Australians by making Australia's transport system more secure against the threat of terrorism and other unlawful acts.

Significant enhancements to transport security were made in 2007-08.

  • Explosive trace detection for air cargo examination at international cargo terminal operations was introduced.
  • The OTS began a review of aviation security screening in response to industry and public concerns about the aviation security screening regime. A high-level external advisory group was established to provide strategic input and advice to assist in guiding the project to effective and practical outcomes for the OTS and the aviation industry.
  • On 1 July 2007, the Regulated Air Cargo Agent (RACA) Security Training Quality Assurance Service commenced delivering a high-quality, competency-based security training system to the air cargo sector. The RACA Security Training Framework operated in parallel with the outgoing training system until 1 January 2008, when the outgoing system ceased.

Quality - Output 2.2.1

Inquiries into major transport security incidents are undertaken as directed by the Minister.

The Inspector of Transport Security Act 2006 (ITS Act), which came into effect on 8 June 2007, provides a statutory framework allowing the inspector to conduct independent 'no-blame' inquiries and make recommendations in relation to transport security and offshore security matters.

Under the ITS Act, the Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government directs the Inspector of Transport Security to inquire into major transport security incidents, circumstances that suggest a systemic failure or weakness in transport security arrangements, or matters that may have implications for transport security arrangements in Australia.

In 2007-08, the inspector commenced an inquiry into the security arrangements for intrastate, privately operated, large commercial passenger ferries.

The assessment will not provide a prescriptive report card on the state of preparedness of individual ferry services, but will draw on the experience of domestic stakeholders and relevant international stakeholders to provide constructive advice on current levels of security effectiveness, practical operational difficulties, implications and challenges, examples of best practice, and possible options for improvement.

Advice to the Australian Government and industry reflects threat and risk assessment.

 

The OTS continued to receive, manage and analyse a wide range of transport security information and intelligence relevant to transport security. This information, once analysed and adapted for industry use, forms the foundation of the Department's risk-based transport security regulatory framework.

During 2007-08 the OTS produced four aviation security quarterly reports, 11 transport security advisories and four quarterly summaries of maritime and aviation security events and incidents, to assist in developing and implementing appropriate preventive security measures and priorities. The 2008 Maritime Security Risk Context Statement was released at the end of June 2008 providing a new assessment of threat and risk in the maritime sector based on current intelligence.

The OTS also provided briefings and presentations in various forums as part of an ongoing stakeholder engagement process to keep industry, other government agencies and foreign partners informed of strategic transport security threats, risks and vulnerabilities.

The OTS participation in threat-related information sharing and policy development forums included supporting the:

  • Airports Intelligence Joint Working Group;
  • Australian Government Counter-Terrorism Committee;
  • Australian Government Counter-Terrorism Policy Committee;
  • Australian Government Transport Security Policy Committee;
  • National Counter-Terrorism Committee;
  • National Security Committee;
  • Secretaries Committee on National Security; and
  • Threat and Risk Assessment Working Group.

The Security Analysis Section within the OTS provides the secretariat for the Australian Government Transport Security Policy Committee.

Our Regulatory Philosophy articulates the Office of Transport Security's approach to regulating preventive security in the transport sector

Our Regulatory Philosophy articulates the Office of Transport Security's approach to regulating preventive security in the transport sector (Photo DITRDLG)

Aviation and maritime security is regulated in line with relevant legislation and is enforced appropriately.

 

Aviation security

Aviation security is regulated by the Aviation Transport Security Act 2004 (ATSA) and the Aviation Transport Security Regulations 2005.

Amendments made to the ATSA in 2007-08 related to:

  • transport security program requirements;
  • screening of dignitaries;
  • aviation security powers for Australian customs officers; and
  • the definition of 'unlawful interference with aviation'.

Further amendments to ATSA in 2007-08 included the ability to make regulations prescribing offences in relation to the disruption to, or interference with, the activities of the operator of a security controlled airport or the activities of an aircraft operator at a security controlled airport. This could, for example, allow regulations to be made regarding the use of lasers to interfere with an aircraft's operations.

The OTS worked with the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) and the Aviation and Airports Division of the Department to coordinate amendments to the Civil Aviation Act 1988 expanding the range of persons capable of being charged with interference with a crew member.

Air cargo security

The Aviation Transport Security Amendment Act 2006 received Royal Assent on 14 September 2006. The amendments created a new division of ATSA for the examination, certification and clearing of air cargo. The amendments better reflect the actual operational needs and practices of the air cargo industry while continuing to meet the security outcomes. The new division provides for the creation of an Accredited Air Cargo Agents (AACA) Scheme and for the mandatory introduction of explosive trace detection (ETD) equipment for the examination of air cargo.

The RACA Quality Assurance Service (QAS) commenced on 1 July 2007, to maintain the quality of the RACA Security Training Framework Accredited Training and Assessment Organisations and monitor the appropriateness of the security training competency standards. The RACA QAS began receiving and assessing applications for accreditation: at 30 June 2008, eight organisations had been granted Regulated Air Cargo Agents Training and Assessment Organisation (RACATO) status.

Maritime security

Maritime security is regulated by the Maritime Transport and Offshore Facilities Security Act 2003 and the Maritime Transport and Offshore Facilities Security Regulations 2003.

No amendments were made to the maritime regulatory framework in 2007-08.

Cross-modal regulatory project

During 2007-08 the OTS developed the OTS Regulatory Philosophy and the OTS Strategic Plan 2007-2010. These documents were developed following consultation with key stakeholders, including heads of federal agencies; regulatory academics; transport industry representatives; unions; and staff. In support of this process a draft OTS regulatory manual was developed which will be finalised in early 2008-09.

The OTS National Compliance Work Program provides assurance that a single, consistent, prioritised security risk-based focus is applied to all OTS compliance activity.

Transport Security Inspector training needs analysis

A transport security inspector training needs analysis was completed and accepted during 2007-08. One recommendation of the analysis was that courses should be developed in conjunction with a registered training organisation. Work has commenced on identifying a suitable organisation.

This will lead to a more consistent regulatory engagement with industry for transport security inspectors and will ensure that audit and compliance activities are undertaken in a nationally consistent manner.

The aviation and maritime industries are engaged in developing and implementing transport security priorities.

 

 

Aviation Security Advisory Forum

The Aviation Security Advisory Forum (ASAF) provides a forum for representatives of the commercial aviation sector to meet with government and explore, through discussion and consultation, a broad range of operational, legal, policy and regulatory issues relating to aviation security. The ASAF is a high-level forum, with most members representing major industry participants such as designated airports and large airlines.

The ASAF has several working groups which include government and industry representatives. The groups undertake informed and detailed work on a number of strategic issues on behalf of the ASAF.

During 2007-08 ASAF meetings were held in Adelaide, Albury (New South Wales), Melbourne and Sydney.

Regional Industry Consultative Meeting

The Regional Industry Consultative Meeting (RICM) complements the ASAF by providing an opportunity for smaller aviation industry participants (such as regional airports and smaller airlines) to consult on aviation security matters.

Two proposed RICM meetings were cancelled during 2007-08, one due to insufficient numbers and one due to the timing of the federal election. RICM meetings were held in Brisbane and Perth.

Maritime Industry Security Consultative Forum

The Maritime Industry Security Consultative Forum (MISCF) provides a forum for the OTS to outline security initiatives to industry, and for industry to provide feedback on these and other maritime security matters. MISCF membership includes industry leaders, industry and employee representative organisations and decision makers who are best placed to provide input to government and communicate with the maritime industry. MISCF has a number of working groups which report back on issues such as passenger ship screening, security guards and port-wide risk assessments.

During 2007-08, MISCF meetings were held in Adelaide and Melbourne.

Oil and Gas Security Forum

The Oil and Gas Security Forum (OGSF) provides a focal point for dialogue where government and industry can collaborate to improve the resilience of the Australian oil and gas sector through the sharing of 'all hazard' information and insights and the consideration of strategic issues for security planning.

The OGSF was established in May 2008 as a sub-group of the Energy Infrastructure Assurance Advisory Group under the Trusted Information Sharing Network for Critical Infrastructure Protection. It is co-chaired by representatives from both industry and government.

The first meeting of the forum, held on 17 June 2008, was attended by senior representatives from the Australian Government and state and territory governments and by officers from 12 of Australia's largest oil, gas and related companies.

The OGSF will develop a strategic directions paper encompassing issues related to sectoral growth, interdependencies and cross-jurisdictional issues, as well as whole-of-supply-chain security planning. Research will also be conducted into international benchmarking - from the perspective of both industry and government - for security in the offshore/upstream environments.

Over the Horizon Roundtable

The Over the Horizon Roundtable is a strategic forum where government and aviation industry leaders discuss emerging aviation security issues and consider implications for longer term aviation security policy development.

The forum met in September 2007 and April 2008. Its discussions broadly focused on the changing aviation security environment, including future challenges and the Australian Government's development of a national aviation policy statement.

Transport Infrastructure Assurance Advisory Group

The OTS leads the Transport Infrastructure Assurance Advisory Group (TIAAG), including subgroups for the aviation, maritime and surface transport sectors.

The Infrastructure Assurance Advisory Groups (IAAGs) are consultative groups within the Trusted Information Sharing Network that enables industry and government to exchange information on issues relating to identifying interdependencies, security risk and business continuity planning and preparedness.

During 2007-08, the OTS delivered a series of scenario-based exercises for the aviation, maritime and surface subgroups of the TIAAG. These scenarios were based on an 'all hazards' response and recovery philosophy that was directed towards a major transport disruptive incident. Exercises were conducted during February 2008 in Melbourne and during June 2008 in Brisbane.

Aviation transport security incident reporting

The OTS continues to enhance the security incident reporting system in consultation with industry. A major initiative involved integrating a daily summary of aviation security-related reporting from the Australian Federal Police to provide a more complete picture of the security environment at major airports. The OTS refined internal processes for reviewing security incident reporting, to enhance consistency in addressing compliance issues with industry and identify and address short-term trends and vulnerabilities.

State and territory governments and industry are assisted to further enhance surface transport security.

Transport Security Working Group

While surface transport security is not a Commonwealth responsibility, the Australian Government works closely with state and territory governments to develop a consistent and coordinated approach. This role is set out in the 2005 Intergovernmental Agreement on Surface Transport Security.

Comprising representatives from all jurisdictions, the Transport Security Working Group (TSWG) is a lead forum for the coordination of a national transport policy response to the threat of terrorism and unlawful acts.

In 2007-08, the TSWG continued to work on mitigating the risk of transport security incidents, to complement the National Counter-Terrorism Arrangements and other national planning arrangements for security and emergency management. These include the ongoing implementation of initiatives arising from the 2006 Inspector of Transport Security's Surface Transport Security Assessment, such as the development of nationally consistent surface transport security planning guidelines, surface transport precinct security guidelines and a security training framework for surface transport operators.

Targeted countries in our region are assisted to improve their transport security capabilities.

Regional transport security capacity building

During 2007-08 the OTS assisted a range of countries in the Asia-Pacific region to develop their compliance with international transport security standards.

  • In East Timor, the OTS delivered an aviation security capacity-building project at Dili Airport in collaboration with the Timorese Government.
  • In Indonesia, the OTS commenced a 13-month aviation security capacity-building project at Kupang Airport, which will strengthen the airport's compliance with international aviation security standards.
  • In the Philippines, the OTS delivered a range of port security training courses and assisted the Philippines Office for Transportation Security to develop port security policies and regulations.

In the Pacific, the OTS worked cooperatively with regional bodies to enhance port security and aviation security, provided technical training assistance for a range of port security courses, and sponsored the inaugural Pacific Maritime Security Conference, held in Fiji in May 2008.

The OTS assisted several countries in the Pacific to enhance their aviation security capacity. This included a successful staff exchange program with the governments of Samoa and Vanuatu; and the delivery of refresher training to aviation security screening staff at Samoa's Faleolo International Airport and Vanuatu's Bauerfield and Pekoa international airports, in conjunction with New Zealand Aviation Security Service.

The OTS continued to support transport security in Papua New Guinea under the Strongim Gavman Program, through the ongoing implementation of maritime security regulations, enhanced aviation security measures and aviation and maritime security capacity building.

Other governments and international organisations are engaged, so as to further Australian interests in the transport security sector.

International Civil Aviation Organization

Australia gives effect to its international obligations under the Convention on International Aviation (the Chicago Convention) through the Crimes (Aviation) Act 1991, the Aviation Transport Security Act 2004 and the Aviation Transport Security Regulations 2005. The body responsible for administering the Chicago Convention is the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO).

Australia, through the OTS, is represented on the Aviation Security Panel of ICAO and participated in the nineteenth meeting of the panel, held at ICAO headquarters in Canada in May 2008. Australia's interests on the panel include the development of aviation security standards and measures. The OTS was also included in the Australian delegation to ICAO's Thirty-sixth General Assembly held in Canada in September 2007.

International Working Group on Land Transport Security

The OTS continued to contribute to the sharing of experience and best practice in the international arena through participation in the International Working Group on Land Transport Security.

The group draws members from countries that operate large mass transit networks or have suffered terrorist attacks on transport systems, including Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Indonesia, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Russia, Spain, the United Kingdom and the United States of America.

Japan chaired and hosted the 2007-08 meetings of the group. Australian representatives gave a well-received presentation on transport precinct security and developed a draft international reference paper on the use of closed-circuit television for counter-terrorism in the mass passenger transport sector.

APEC Mass Passenger Surface Transport Security Conference

In April 2008, Australia (represented by the OTS) and the Philippines jointly hosted an Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Mass Passenger Surface Transport Security Conference in Manila. The conference provided a forum for the sharing of best practice in mass passenger transport security, exposure to leading world transport security experts and a platform for nations to build effective working relationships in this transport sector.

International forums on maritime security

The OTS engaged with foreign governments and international organisations through a number of forums dealing with maritime security issues, including the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and APEC, during 2007-08.

The OTS takes a lead role in the consideration of international maritime security as the Chair of the IMO Maritime Security Working Group. In 2007-08, the OTS chaired one meeting of the group, held in Denmark in October 2007.

The OTS also plays an active role in the security subgroup of the Maritime Experts Group of the APEC Transportation Working Group. The OTS attended meetings of the subgroup, held in Taiwan and the Philippines.

The OTS also led or participated in APEC maritime security workshops and exercises held in Papua New Guinea and Fiji, and participated in a Transport Security Workshop held in Cambodia, led by the Australian Department of Defence.

International engagement on aviation security

The OTS played a leading role in the establishment of an aviation security-related discussion forum known as the QUAD. The QUAD is an informal group of like-minded aviation security regulators from Australia, Canada, the European Commission and the United States of America, which explores harmonising solutions to emerging and challenging high-priority aviation security issues.

The creation of the QUAD has enabled constructive discussion on a wide range of aviation policy issues and has facilitated development of new international aviation security settings and standards.

Transport security support to special events and counter-terrorism exercises are coordinated.

Special events and counter-terrorism exercises

The OTS successfully supported transport security arrangements for the APEC Leaders Week meeting held in Sydney in September 2007. Transport Security Inspectors (TSI) from all OTS state security offices were deployed to New South Wales regional airports to provide an enhanced security presence, integrated with the Department of Defence and New South Wales Police on the APEC airspace security arrangements. The OTS New South Wales State Security Office provided an enhanced TSI presence at Sydney (Kingsford Smith) Airport for the duration of the APEC Leaders Week.

In support of World Youth Day 2008, to be held in Sydney in July 2008, the OTS participated in security planning, assisted in developing the airspace risk assessment, and facilitated the establishment of special airspace around World Youth Day venues and oversight of security preparations at Sydney (Kingsford Smith) Airport.

The OTS participated fully in national exercises coordinated by the Attorney-General's Department and conducted under the auspices of the National Counter-Terrorism Committee.

Government policy decisions on transport security are implemented on time and within budget.

Checked baggage screening

The first phase of the checked baggage screening (CBS) initiative for regional domestic airports announced in the 2007-08 budget commenced on 1 December 2007. This involved the screening of checked baggage using ETD equipment and was delivered as required and within budget.

Quantity - Output 2.2.1

Transport security, audit and compliance activity is conducted at/for approximately:

  • 412 aviation industry participants covering 188 airports across Australia and 224 domestic and international airlines
  • 10,000 general aviation aircraft on a risk assessed basis
  • approximately 850 Regulated Air Cargo Agents
  • 264 maritime security plan holders covering 73 ports, 364 related facilities and 59 Australian flagged vessels,
  • 22 offshore oil and gas security plans covering 76 offshore service providers and offshore facilities.

The OTS is responsible for delivering a transport security audit and compliance regime based on risk assessments of the regulated participants, incorporating elements of threat, vulnerability and industry information. Through the OTS, Australia conducts audit and compliance activities in line with international benchmarking of comparable countries such as Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States of America.

Significant effort is also made to maintain the currency of industry participants' transport security programs.

The OTS employed 128 transport security inspectors in 2007-08.

In 2007-08, the OTS conducted 1,618 compliance activities in the aviation industry. These activities were focused on the compliance of Australia's major international airports, screened airports, international airlines, regulated air cargo agents and major domestic airlines. Collectively these comprised over 80 per cent of compliance activity.

The OTS conducted 1,740 compliance activities in the maritime industry in 2007-08.

More than 11,000 foreign ships are risk assessed and security inspections targeted as appropriate.

The OTS monitors all visits by foreign vessels. The OTS conducted 1,149 targeted inspections of foreign-flagged ships based on security compliance checks conducted on 12,084 foreign-regulated ships seeking entry to Australian ports.

Aviation Security Identification Card (ASIC) - management of background checking of up to 93,000 aviation participants.

The OTS assessed approximately 13,700 ASIC applications between 1 July and 3 September 2007. From this date, the responsibility for the background checking of ASIC applicants transferred to the centralised government vetting agency, AusCheck, a division of the Attorney-General's Department. The OTS continues to be responsible for establishing the policy, regulatory standards and administrative processes attached to the ASIC scheme.

Maritime Security Identification Card (MSIC) - management of background checking of up to 82,000 people in the maritime industry.

The OTS assessed approximately 4,500 MSIC applications between 1 July and 3 September 2007. From this date, the responsibility for the background checking of MSIC applicants was transferred to the centralised government vetting agency, AusCheck, a division of the Attorney-General's Department. The OTS continues to be responsible for establishing the policy, regulatory standards and administrative processes attached to the MSIC scheme.

Administered programs for Output 2.2.1 - Transport security policy, programs and regulation

Table 4.5 Summary of performance - Aviation security enhancements: checked baggage screening

Performance indicators Results
Effectiveness

Checked baggage on screened air services at non-designated screened airports is subject to security screening.

Checked baggage screening occurred on screened air services at non-designated screening airports from 1 December 2007.

In the lead-up to the use of explosive trace detection to screen checked baggage, the OTS, in consultation with industry, developed a regional engagement and communications package that focused on the mining sector and aimed to educate members of the travelling public on new procedures at airports.

Quantity/Location

Explosive trace detection equipment is being used to screen 100% of checked bags at 26 non-designated airports.

Funding was provided to 29 airports for the purchase of explosive trace detection equipment. Equipment was deployed at all regional domestic jet airports to introduce random and continuous checked baggage screening to commence on or before 1 December 2007.

A total of $2 million was provided across states and territories - New South Wales, the Northern Territory, Queensland, Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia.

Cost

$7.6 million

The actual cost of this program in 2007-08 was $2.5 million. The underspend of $5.1 million was due to approved airport funding applications and executed Funding Agreements not requiring payment during 2007-08. Approval has been provided to move $5.1 million to 2008-09.

Overall performance Mostly achieved.

 

Did you know

ASIC & MSIC
Persons seeking access to the secure areas of our air and sea ports must apply for an Aviation Security Identification Card or a Maritime Security Identification Card, as relevant. Establishing a persons's eligibility for the issue of an identification card involves undertaking a number of checks relating to operational need, proof of identity, security risk, criminal history and, where appropriate, immigration status.

Table 4.6 Summary of performance - Aviation security enhancements: improving international aviation security

Performance indicators Results
Effectiveness

Improved aviation security at Last Port of Call airports, consistent with international standards.

In 2007-08, Australia and the Philippines progressed an aviation security training initiative with in-principle agreement reached for an aviation security management plan. The OTS sponsored a number of Filipino aviation security officials to attend ICAO standard aviation security training courses. The Philippines Government progressed property arrangements for the establishment of the Philippines' Aviation Security Training Facility.

Location

Asia-Pacific Region.

The initiative will improve the standard of aviation security in the Philippines through the establishment of an aviation security training centre in Manila.

Cost

$1.0 million

The actual cost of this program in 2007-08 was $0.1 million. The underspend of $0.9 million was due to extended delays in the Philippines Office for Transportation Security securing a 25 year lease on a building to house the aviation security training facility.

Approval has been provided to move $0.9 million to 2008-09.

Overall performance Mostly achieved.

Table 4.7 Summary of performance - Aviation security enhancements: increased air cargo inspections

Performance indicators Results
Effectiveness

Strengthened security measures for international and domestic passenger aircraft through increased inspection of air cargo.

The purchase of explosive trace detection (ETD) equipment to be used by industry for the examination of air cargo loaded at specified Australian airports was completed during 2007-08.

During 2007-08 a further 27 ETD units were purchased at a cost of $1.4 million, bringing the total deployed to 123 units.

Enhanced air cargo inspection regime of international export air cargo carried on passenger services.

X-ray equipment capability and industry impact trials were conducted to evaluate the capacity for X-ray technology to detect explosives and improvised explosive devices within units of air cargo. The trials assessed the impact on industry's operational costs and performance.

Location

Major Australian airports and cargo facilities.

ETD equipment is now located and operated at major Australian airports and cargo terminal facilities where cargo is prepared for loading onto aircraft.

Cost

$3.8 million

The actual cost of this program in 2007-08 was $3.0 million. The underspend of $0.8 million was due to the ETD equipment costing less than originally budgeted and costs associated with the hire and installation of X-ray equipment being lower than forecast.

Overall performance Mostly achieved.

Usage of hand-held ETD equipment that searches for traces of explosive residue on checked-in baggage

Usage of hand-held ETD equipment that searches for traces of explosive residue on checked-in baggage (Photo DITRDLG)

Table 4.8 Summary of performance - Aviation security enhancements: regional passenger screening

Performance indicators Results
Effectiveness

Security is enhanced at regional airports handling regular public transport services.

The OTS continued to deliver a regional passenger screening capability as part of the Securing Our Regional Skies package to improve security for Australia's regional airports and airlines.

Regional passenger screening has been implemented by providing hand-held metal-detecting kits and associated training at up to 145 regional airports that are regulated under the Aviation Transport Security Regulations 2005. These measures may enable regional airports to continue to operate in the event of a heightened security alert.

In addition to achieving an important security outcome, this program has provided training to Australians living in remote regional areas.

Quantity/Location

Metal detection equipment and training is provided to 145 regional airports.

The provision of metal detection equipment was completed in 2006-07. Since then the program has concentrated on providing training to eligible airports in New South Wales, the Northern Territory, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia.

All but six of the eligible security controlled airports participated in the round of training in 2007-08.

Cost

$1.0 million

The actual cost of this program in 2007-08 was $0.8 million. The underspend of $0.2 million was due to the lack of airports/councils requesting reimbursement of expenses incurred for participants undertaking hand wand metal detection/security training in regional Australia.

Overall performance Mostly achieved.

Table 4.9 Summary of performance - Aviation security enhancements: screening for liquids, aerosols and gels

Performance indicators Results
Effectiveness

Integration of technology in enhanced passenger screening processes with minimal impact on passenger clearance rates.

The OTS commenced laboratory trials to assess the effectiveness of commercially available technologies that claim to be able to detect explosives in liquids, aerosols and gels.

Three types of passenger screening equipment are being trialledmaterials analysis equipment, such as bottle scanners; advanced technology X-ray for carry-on luggage; and body scanners.

Quality

Improved aviation security consistent with international requirements.

The OTS liaised with independent scientific bodies, Australian and international industry bodies, overseas governments and other Australian Government agencies to ensure aviation security enhancements are consistent with international requirements. Scientific standards and methodologies will be developed to ensure replicable and comparable results can be obtained.

Location

11 Counter-Terrorism First Response airports and identified domestic airports.

Following laboratory trials, operational trials will be conducted at three selected Australian airports, encompassing both international and domestic passengers, to assess the capacity for integration of the technologies into enhanced passenger screening processes with minimum impact on passenger clearance rates. The project is due to conclude by December 2008.

Cost

$4.4 million

The actual cost of this program in 2007-08 was $0.9 million.

The underspend of $3.5 million was due to delays in procuring suitable screening technology and laboratory test sites. Approval has been provided to move $3.5 million to 2008-09.

Overall performance Mostly achieved.

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