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Report on performance

Transport outputs and programmes

Output 1.2.1: Transport Security

(Inspector of Transport Security, Office of Transport Security)

Effectiveness

Transport security is maintained and enhanced

The Australian Government is working with state and territory governments and industry to improve the security of Australia's transport system and reduce the likelihood of transport being a target of or used as a vehicle for terrorism.

The government sets and enforces a preventative security framework for the aviation, air cargo and maritime sectors, and works with state and territory governments to implement effective preventative security measures in surface transport under an Intergovernmental Agreement on Surface Transport Security signed by all jurisdictions in June 2005.

The department provides policy advice to the Australian Government on transport security matters and consults with other Australian Government agencies, state and territory governments and the transport industry, in order to:

  • provide information about threats to the transport sector
  • contribute to critical infrastructure protection
  • provide advice on international transport security developments and implications for Australian Government policies and practices.

Significant enhancements to transport security in 2005-06 included:

  • government agreement to the implementation of the 17 recommendations made by Sir John Wheeler in his September 2005 review of airport security and policing (see 68 for an update on the Wheeler Review)
  • enhanced background checking of applicants for maritime and aviation security identity cards and streamlining of processes with the establishment of a dedicated Background Checking Unit within the Office of Transport Security (OTS)
  • Australia meeting, from 31 December 2005, the international requirement that all checked baggage on international flights departing Australia be screened

John Moody, State Manager SA/NT Office of Transport Security, at the gates of Port Thevenard (Ceduna), the most isolated South Australian port the government regulates. (Photo DOTARS)

  • regional aviation security enhancements with closed-circuit television (CCTV) trials occurring at four regional airports and a $1.5 million extension to the Regional Airport Funding Programme announced by the government
  • metal-detection equipment and associated training provided to over 140 regional airports and over 780 candidates trained and assessed as competent in the use of the equipment
  • allocation of $38 million in additional funding to strengthen air cargo security arrangements.

Quality

Inquiries into major transport security incidents are undertaken as directed by the Minister

At the Australian Transport Council (ATC) meeting of 18 November 2005, transport ministers supported a proposal to convene a sub-group of transport officials from the joint Australian and state and territory government Transport Security Working Group (TSWG) to assist the Inspector of Transport Security, Mr Mick Palmer AO APM, to work with surface transport operators to advise on:

  • the ability of private operators to undertake risk assessments and develop and implement security programmes
  • security training and staff awareness
  • the relationship between operators and counter-terrorism arrangements
  • relationships with government regulatory agencies.

The National Counter-Terrorism Committee (NCTC) meeting of 14-15 December 2005 noted the decision of the ATC for the Inspector of Transport Security to undertake a review of surface transport. The inspector, in collaboration with the working group, will advise the ATC and the Standing Committee on Transport of his findings through both interim and final reports.

Work on the development of the Inspector of Transport Security legislation has progressed. Consultation with state and territory governments and other Australian Government agencies in 2005 prompted some changes in policy direction and these are being incorporated in the draft Bill.

Among other things, the legislation will support the capacity of the inspector to conduct inquiries into transport security incidents on the same 'no blame' basis that has proved successful in transport safety investigations undertaken by ATSB.

A limited exposure draft was released early in the 2006-07 reporting year, and consultation with state and territory governments and transport industry participants has taken place. The government expects to be able to introduce the Bill into Parliament during October 2006.

Advice to the Australian Government reflects threat and risk assessment and relevant international practice

The OTS provides security risk guidance material and strategic transport security related advice to inform Australian Government policy and planning. In 2005-06 OTS provided:

  • sectoral security risk context statements for aviation, land freight transport infrastructure, and bridges and tunnels
  • transport security advisories in response to changes in the national and international security environment
  • an aviation security quarterly report, in line with Wheeler review recommendations, combining threat and criminality assessments from the Australian Security and Intelligence Organisation and the Australian Crime Commission
  • a summary of maritime and aviation security events and incidents that were reported to theOTS Operations Centre and subsequently analysed to inform development of threat and risk-based policy formation and decision making.

Acting on advice from the department, the Australian Government:

  • developed, produced and distributed a basic security awareness training package to all regional airport and airline operators
  • strengthened regional aviation security by providing hardened cockpit doors to regional jet aircraft
  • worked with targeted countries in the Asia-Pacific region to improve aviation and maritime security
  • managed the transport security aspects of the Commonwealth Games (see page 67 for case study)
  • initiated development of the Aviation Security Training Framework, which will articulate security-specific competencies for workers within the aviation industry at security controlled airports and so strengthen the current approach to aviation security training
  • released a public information brochure on the carriage of prohibited items by persons with bona fide medical conditions
  • developed standard guidelines for the screening of particular categories of very important persons, including visiting foreign heads of state, diplomats and other foreign dignitaries.

Aviation and maritime security is regulated in line with relevant legislation and is enforced appropriately

Aviation security

Aviation security is regulated by the Aviation Transport Security Act 2004 and the complementary Aviation Transport Security Regulations 2005. During 2005-06:

  • major airlines and airports submitted new transport security programmes for approval consistent with the requirements of the Aviation Transport Security Act 2004
  • 105 aircraft and airline operators submitted draft transport security programmes to the department by 9 March 2006 for its consideration. An initial assessment was carried out on each of these draft programmes before 30 June 2006
  • regulatory oversight of the transport security programmes continued in 2005-06
  • in response to Recommendation 15 of the Wheeler review, development of an Aviation Security Training Framework was begun
  • a revised version of the Methods, techniques and equipment to be used for screening was released. This document, issued under the Aviation Transport Security Regulations 2005, specifies national standards to be used for screening. The department works with industry to continually refine screening standards and practices.
  • 100 per cent of outgoing checked baggage on international flights was screened using X-ray screening equipment. Australia was one year ahead of the International Civil Aviation Organization's 1January 2006 deadline for 100 per cent screening of international checked baggage.

Air cargo security

In September 2005 the government announced the allocation of $38 million in additional funding to strengthen air cargo security arrangements. The department was funded to undertake the following activities:

  • the regulated air cargo agent scheme, the primary regulatory framework for the domestic and international air cargo industry, was subject to increased audit and compliance activities. The funding included provision for 29 additional transport security inspectors based in the OTS state offices.
  • major air cargo handlers have been provided with explosives trace detection equipment to be used in cargo terminals that handle international air cargo. The equipment will be operated by industry in accordance with training and operating procedures developed by the department and the Australian Customs Service.
  • the department commissioned Siemens Ltd to identify options for a nationally consistent approach to business verification throughout the air cargo supply chain. The consultancy is complete and the final report was submitted in June 2006.
  • as the first stage of the targeted security awareness package, two series of workshops involving approximately 500 regulated air cargo agents were held around Australia between January and May 2006.
  • in collaboration with the air cargo sector, the Transport and Logistics Industry Skills Council (Transport and Distribution Training Australia) prepared national competency-based training standards for regulated air cargo agents.

Maritime security

Maritime security is regulated by the Maritime Transport and Offshore Facilities Security Act 2003 and the complementary Maritime Transport and Offshore Facilities Security Regulations 2003.

Twenty-four additional maritime transport security inspectors were trained in 2005-06 and, at 30 June 2006, there were 63 maritime transport security inspectors based in the state offices across Australia.

As at 30 June 2006, the department was responsible for regulating the security arrangements of 553 maritime industry participants, including 71 ports, 211 port facilities, 141 port service providers, 59 Australian flagged ships, 65 offshore oil and gas facilities and 6 offshore oil and gas service providers.

Rollout of the Maritime Security Identification Card Scheme commenced on 1November 2005. The scheme requires that, by 1 January 2007, all persons needing unescorted or unmonitored access to maritime security zones hold a valid maritime security identification card.

Amendments were developed to the Maritime Transport and Offshore Facilities Security Act 2003, to enhance the powers of maritime security guards and to simplify the approval process for changes to security plans. As at 30 June 2006, these amendments had been introduced and were awaiting passage through Parliament.

Strengthening maritime security, a publication to assist industry and other stakeholders with understanding their obligations under the Maritime Transport and Offshore Facilities Security Act 2003, was released in May 2006.

In 2005-06, the department hosted three meetings of the Maritime Industry Security Consultative Forum, each attended by 45 to 55 industry representatives, in order to increase government-industry collaboration.

The department continues to engage with the maritime and offshore oil and gas industries on maritime security through its participation at key regional and general industry events.

Transport Security Plan Assessment and Compliance Environment (TSPACE)

The TSPACE information technology platform was developed during 2005-06 and went live in early 2006-07. This system manages the lodgement, assessment and approval of all transport security plans across offshore, maritime, air cargo and aviation transport modes. TSPACE also manages the results of transport security audit and compliance activities across the country.

TSPACE will provide a single, cross-modal workflow and management mechanism for the lodgement, review, approval and maintenance of transport security plans. It also supports compliance and audit activities and acts as a database for OTS's customer and contact information.

The aviation and maritime industries are engaged in developing and implementing transport security priorities

OTS worked with the Australian intelligence community and law enforcement agencies to produce strategic threat and risk information products to assist industry in developing and implementing transport security priorities. These products included:

  • sectoral security risk context statements (RCSs) for aviation, land freight transport infrastructure, and bridges and tunnels. The aviation security RCSs highlight threats to aviation from politically motivated violence (terrorism) and criminality, identifying security risks and vulnerabilities to assist aviation industry participants' security policy and planning.
  • eight transport security advisories (TSAs) provided to transport industry participants through the Trusted Information Sharing Network and OTS state offices. TSAs are developed in response to changes in the national and international security environment.
  • the aviation security quarterly report, provided to aviation industry participants, in line with Wheeler review recommendations. This report synthesises threat and criminality information provided by the Australian Security and Intelligence Organisation and the Australian Crime Commission to assist industry in the development and implementation of transport security priorities. This information was provided to industry through the Aviation Security Advisory Forum.
  • the OTS summary of maritime security events and incidents that were reported to theOperations Centre. The summary was made availableto industry through the Maritime Industry Consultative Forum.This information assisted maritime industry participants in their security planning.

Regional aviation

The department continued to engage with the regional aviation industry on aviation security priorities and related issues, through its participation at key regional and general aviation industry events and at the quarterly regional industry consultative meetings. These meetings are hosted by OTS around the country and are usually attended by around 55 to 65 industry representatives of, for example, regional airports, airlines and pilots. The meetings provide the department with the opportunity to explain government initiatives and to receive feedback on security measures.

In regional Australia in 2005-06, the OTS:

  • ensured hardened cockpit doors were installed in jet aircraft used on regional routes
  • delivered metal-detection equipment (hand wands) to over 140 regional airports and trained staff in their use
  • continued to monitor the trial of CCTV use at four regional airports
  • administered funding for the successful delivery of capability building for regional police forces around the country, to ensure that local police, who are likely to be called to respond to incidents, have an understanding of airport operations and are trained on how best to deal with aviation security incidents
  • delivered a self-paced learning package Strengthening aviation security that covers basic security awareness for regional airline and airport operators and their staff.

State and territory governments are assisted to improve surface transport security

Surface transport

While surface transport security is the responsibility of the state or territory in which the service is located, the Australian Government works with other governments to develop a consistent and coordinated approach. This role is set out in the Inter-Governmental Agreement on Surface Transport Security signed by all jurisdictions in June 2005.

The TSWG is the main forum for progressing transport security issues. The group, established in 2003, comprises senior transport officials from each state, territory and the department and reports through the chief executive officers of transport departments to transport ministers (the ATC). Sectoral security risk context statements for land freight transport infrastructure, and bridges and tunnels, were delivered through the TSWG to assist transport operators improve surface transport security.

The department assisted in the conduct of a joint assessment between the TSWG and the National Counter-Terrorism Committee (NCTC), on whether any additional surface transport security initiatives should be considered by governments. The assessment report was considered by COAG, which noted the findings of the assessment and agreed to strengthen and build on existing transport security arrangements through a range of measures which aim to:

  • further develop and implement technological and other solutions
  • broaden the capacity of transport operators, their staff and the public to contribute to the security of surface transport
  • facilitate incident planning and preparation by operators
  • support an integrated approach to transport precinct security.

The department contributed to work on a national approach to closed-circuit television (CCTV), also agreed by COAG, including a code of practice for CCTV in the mass passenger transport sector and a review of current CCTV capability.

The government sponsored a visit to Australia by a senior security adviser to the UK Government in April 2006. The purpose of the visit was to inform and educate government and key industry stakeholders on vehicle-borne improvised explosive device threats and mitigation techniques. The visit was very well received and highlighted the importance and value of this type of information exchange.

Targeted countries in our region are assisted to improve their transport security capabilities

Overseas presence and projects expanded

In 2005-06 the government worked closely with countries in the Asia-Pacific region to improve both aviation and maritime security. Key activities included:

  • enhancing Australia's overseas presence, with two additional officers posted to Jakarta, and one additional officer posted to Manila
  • improving regional aviation security through a series of aviation security risk management workshops in selected countries in the region
  • enhancing the ability of port security officers in Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) countries to implement the International Shipping and Port Facility Security Code by delivering seminars in collaboration with the Singaporean Government
  • engaging with APEC groups such as the Transport Working Group and the Counter-Terrorism Task Force to improve multilateral coordination on transport security issues in the region
  • enhancing aviation security in Indonesia by delivering phases I and II of the Indonesian-Australian Aviation Security Capacity Building Project and conducting study tours of Australian airports for Indonesian aviation security officials
  • supporting Australian Government security in East Timor by coordinating an interdepartmental committee on whole-of-government security capacity building assistance
  • enhancing maritime security in the Philippines by continuing to deliver, and to expand, the Philippines-Australia Port Security Capacity Building Project, and sponsoring participants in the Lloyd's List Port and Maritime Security Conference 2006
  • strengthening Pacific aviation and maritime security engagement and cooperation by adding two Pacific security liaison officers, and by conducting aviation and maritime security audits and workshops under the Australian Government's Pacific Governance Support Programme
  • strengthening governance of aviation and maritime security in Papua New Guinea through the Enhanced Cooperation Programme.

Quantity

Transport security, audit and compliance activity is conducted at/for approximately

- 180 airports across Australia

- 160 domestic and international airlines

- domestic and international air cargo operations

- 7,500 general aviation aircraft on a risk assessed basis

- 240 maritime security plan holders covering 70 ports and 300 related facilities

A framework has been established to prioritise audit and compliance activity using threat and vulnerability information. This framework provides risk-based guidance to resource allocation within the national audit and compliance programme.

Regular analysis of reported transport security events and incidentshas commenced for both the aviation and maritime sectors. Analytical reporting provides input into broader transport security policy development and will provide guidance for audit and compliance activity.

Aviation security

As at 30 June 2006, 118 transport security inspectors were employed within OTS. In September 2005, the government provided funding to increase the department's air cargo audit capacity. The inspectors:

  • audited all 11 major airports and all 28 other airports conducting passenger screening and also visited or inspected security-controlled Australian airports on over 600 occasions
  • audited operations of all major domestic airlines, and conducted 72 audits of the local operations of international airlines (passenger or cargo operators) currently operating in Australia
  • carried out over 530 inspections of domestic airline operations and another 171 inspections of international airlines operating through Australia
  • visited airports and airlines more frequently to carry out inspections and attend airport security meetings and exercises (a total of 534 visits and meetings)
  • inspected 161 regulated air cargo agents.

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Aviation security industry participants, and audit and compliance activities

Table 3.4 shows the numbers of aviation security industry participants requiring an audit in 2004-05 and 2005-06.
Table 3.5 sets out the number of completed audit and compliance activities.

Table 3.4 Aviation security industry participants requiring audit, 2004-05 and 2005-06

Industry sector

Number of participants

2004-05

2005-06

Airports

- major

11

11

- screened

24

28

- regional

135

148

Airlines

- foreign regular public transport

57a

73b

- domestic regular public transport

126

132

Regulated air cargo agents

901

836

General aviation aircraft

7,500

10,904c

a Passenger only.
b Passenger and cargo
c Bureau of Transport and Regional Economics figures for all powered fixed and rotary-wing aircraft are now subject to the Aviation Transport Security Regulations 2005.

Table 3.5 Completed audit and compliance activities, 2004-05 and 2005-06

Audit and compliance task

Number completed

2004-05

2005-06

New transport security programmes (TSPs) approved (airlines and airports)

335

26a

Airline audits (domestic and international)

126

97

Airline inspections (domestic and international)

n/a

701

General aviation inspections

651

1,686b

Regulated air cargo agent audits and inspections

146

286

a 89 airport and airline draft TSPs were submitted for consideration by the department in accordance with Regulations 2.24 (Airport) and 2.46 (Airlines) of the Aviation Transport Security Regulations 2005.
b As at 31 May 2006.

Quantity

Transport security, audit and compliance activity is conducted at/for approximately

- 180 airports across Australia

- 160 domestic and international airlines

- domestic and international air cargo operations

- 7,500 general aviation aircraft on a risk assessed basis

- 240 maritime security plan holders covering 70 ports and 300 related facilities (continued)

Maritime security

During 2005-06 the number of regulated maritime industry participants has increased by 36%. As required by the Maritime Transport Offshore Facilities Security Act 2004, in 2005-06 the OTS inspected more than 841 foreign-flagged vessels for compliance with domestic and international security regulations.

During 2005-06, transport security inspectors:

  • carried out 136 per cent of scheduled seaport audits (exceeded audit requirements) and 77 per cent of port facilities audits
  • audited 97 per cent of maritime security plans
  • continued to carry out more security-related visits to seaports and associated facilities.

Maritime security industry participants, and audit and compliance activities

Table 3.6 shows the numbers of maritime security industry participants that required audit in 2004-05 and 2005-06. Table 3.7 shows the number of audit and compliance activities completed by the department.

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Table 3.6 Maritime security industry participants requiring audit in 2004-05 and 2005-06

Industry sector

Number of participants

2004-05

2005-06

Seaports

71

71

Service providers

100

141

Port facilities

179

211

Australian-flagged vessels

57

59

Oil and gas facilities

n/a

65

Oil and gas service providers

n/a

6

Total bodies regulated

407

553

Proportion of bodies covered by approved plan/certificate at any time

100%

100%

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Table 3.7 Audit and compliance activities completed in 2004-05 and 2005-06

Audit and compliance task

Number completed

2004-05

2005-06

New and revised security plans approved

252

129

Assessments of security plans

52

99

Number of first port arrivals by foreign-flagged vessels

n/a

11,156

Vessels issued with control directions for not holding valid international ship security certificates

6

-

Detailed vessel inspections involving the department

153

841

Quantity

Approximately 50 offshore oil and gas platforms are incorporated into the Maritime Transport
Security Act

Strengthening offshore oil and gas security

Following extension of the Maritime Transport and Offshore Facilities Security Act 2003 to cover Australia's offshore oil and gas facilities in 2004-05, offshore industry participants successfully met the legislative deadline of 30 September 2005 to have approved offshore security plans in place.

As at 30 June 2006, there were 21 offshore security plans in place covering all 62 offshore oil and gas facilities.

All the oil and gas facilities will be security audited over two and a half years.

More than 11, 000 foreign ships are risk assessed and security inspections targeted as appropriate

Foreign-flagged vessels subject of closely scrutinised

Since 1 July 2004, every foreign-flagged ship seeking entry into Australia has been subject to a risk assessment to enable inspections to be prioritised. Many of these ships are also subject to a security inspection. Any foreign-flagged vessel entering Australian waters without a valid international ship security certificate is issued a compliance control direction, and is not permitted to re-enter Australian waters until the vessel has a valid certificate.

In 2005-06 the department:

  • risk assessed and monitored the activities of every foreign-flagged ship entering Australian waters
  • authorised officers of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority to conduct first-line inspections in conjunction with their port state control function
  • undertook 841 detailed ship inspections-an average of over 16 ships a week. This exceeded the previously established target of 780.

Price

$65.8m

The actual price of this output in 2005-06 was $62.9 million.

Overall performance

Administered programme: Aviation security enhancements-assistance to regional passenger aircraft
(Office of Transport Security)

Effectiveness/location

Security is enhanced on regular public transport and open charter services operating in regional Australia

In accordance with the Aviation Transport Security Act 2004 and its supporting regulations, all regular public transport aircraft with 30 seats or more must install hardened cockpit doors. The government made funds available to eligible regional aircraft to fund the purchase and installation of hardened cockpit doors.

Quality

Hardened cockpit doors are installed in passenger aircraft with 30 or more seats

Hardened cockpit doors have been installed in all eligible regular public transport aircraft servicing regional Australia.

Cost

$0.8m

The actual cost of this programme in 2005-06 was $0.5 million. The programme has now been completed.

Overall performance

Administered programme: Aviation security enhancements-improving international outreach
(Office of Transport Security)

Effectiveness

Improved aviation security at last port of call airports, consistent with international standards

Aviation security at 'last port of call' airports has been improved through the provision of training and capacity building to raise aviation security standards to the ICAO internationally accepted standards.

Quality/Location

Asia-Pacific region

The government has provided funding to the department to improve aviation security in regional countries. These funds will be used to support regional country representatives to attend ICAO aviation security training courses.

Cost

$0.02m

The actual cost of this programme in 2005-06 was nil, with the funding carried forward to 2006-07.

Overall performance

Administered programme: Aviation security enhancements-increased air cargo inspections
(Office of Transport Security)

Effectiveness

Enhanced cargo inspection regime of international export cargo carried on passenger services

In response to the recommendations of the Wheeler review, the government funded explosive trace detection units for international outbound air cargo. The department has completed arrangements for international cargo terminal operators to purchase explosive trace detection equipment and be reimbursed by the department. Operators will commence using the equipment in 2006-07.

Quality/Location

Australian international airports

The explosive detection equipment will be located and applied at cargo terminal facilities where export cargo is prepared for loading onto the aircraft.

Cost

$4.9m

The actual cost of this programme in 2005-06 was $2.7 million. The remaining funding has been carried forward to 2006-07.

Overall performance

Administered programme: Aviation security enhancements-regional airport 24-hour closed-circuit television pilot study
(Office of Transport Security)

Quality/Location

Closed-circuit television (CCTV) is evaluated as an aid to security at four regional airports

As part of the 'Securing our Regional Skies' package announced in August 2004, the installation of the CCTV system has been completed at the four trial sites to assess its significance as a deterrent to acts of unlawful interference with aviation. An evaluation of the systems has commenced and will be completed in 2006-07.

Cost

$2.0m (up from $0.535m at Budget)

The actual cost of this programme in 2005-06 was $1.8 million.

Overall performance

Administered programme: Aviation security enhancements-regional airport security
(Office of Transport Security)

Quality/Locationa

As the government is committed to protecting Australia's aviation industry and the many millions of passengers it carries each year, funds were made available to assist regional airports to implement a range of basic security measures through the Regional Airports Funding Programme (RAFP) administered by the Australian Airports Association. So far, 121 of 145 regional airports have accessed $28.6million to implement basic security infrastructure, including fencing, lighting, CCTV and alarm systems, locking devices, signage and access control measures.

Additional funds of $1.5 million were made available to expand the programme to another five regional airports to implement basic security infrastructure in accordance with their security risk assessment and transport security programme.

Regional airports will continue to implement basic security measures such as fencing, lighting and CCTV through the RAFP.

a No performance indicator was published.

Cost

$1.5m (announced in the PSAES as 'National Security - regional airport security' )

The actual cost of this programme in 2005-06 was $1.5 million.

Overall performance

Administered programme: Aviation security enhancements-regional passenger screening
(Office of Transport Security)

Effectiveness

Security is enhanced at regional airports handling regular public transport services

The Securing our Regional Skies package was announced in August 2004 to improve the response capacity, capability building and deterrence for Australia's regional airports and airlines.

Regional passenger scanning is being implemented by providing hand-wand metal-detecting kits and staff training at approximately 140 regional airports operating regular public transport services. These measures will enable regional airports to continue to operate should there be a heightened security alert.

Quantity/Location

Metal-detection equipment and training is provided to 140 regional airports

Metal-detection equipment and training for regional airports across Australia continued in 2005-06. In total, 781 candidates were trained and assessed as competent and 136 airports gained the metal-detection capability. The second round of training will commence in 2006-07 to reinforce training outcomes and to maintain a metal-detection capability at each airport.

Cost

$3.0m (up from $2.7m at Budget)

The actual cost of this programme in 2005-06 was $2.5 million, less than expected due to a delay in airports claiming reimbursement for travel expenses. Remaining funds have been carried forward to 2006-07.

Overall performance

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Update-Wheeler review implementation

On 5 June 2005, the Rt Hon. Sir John Wheeler was invited by the Australian Government to undertake a review of Australia's aviation security and policing arrangements. Sir John delivered his report, An independent review of airport security and policing for the Government of Australia (the Wheeler review), to the government in September 2005 with 17 recommendations.

The review's recommendations dealt with a range of security and policing issues. The department is directly responsible for implementing a number of these recommendations.

Recommendation lV of the Wheeler review stated that the Office of Transport Security be given additional analytical and reporting capability, to enable it, among other things, to produce regular reports on security issues facing Australia's aviation industry. This model is also intended to be applicable to Australia's maritime and land industries.

In line with the review's recommendations, the government has:

  • recruited state-based security analysis liaison officers to enhance the reciprocal feedback of transport security-related information between industry and government
  • produced the sectoral Aviation Security Risk Context Statement (RCS) in December 2005. The Aviation Security RCS was delivered to aviation industry participants in collaboration with state and territory government agencies in a series of threat and risk briefings across all jurisdictions
  • developed the Aviation Security Quarterly Report and disseminated it to aviation industry participants. The quarterly report synthesises threat and criminality information provided by the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation and the Australian Crime Commission to assist industry in the development and implementation of transport security priorities. This information was provided to industry through the Aviation Security Advisory Forum
  • sponsored a visit by a senior security adviser to the UK Government to Australia in April 2006. The purpose of the visit was to inform and educate government and key industry stakeholders on vehicle-borne improvised explosive device threats and mitigation techniques
  • strengthened background checking of applicants for security identification cards. The aviation security identification card background checking regime was strengthened by removing the grandfathering provision, including a pattern of criminality and providing for more frequent background checking where a lower level of criminal activity is evident. The regulatory changes have been made and the new strengthened disqualifying criteria for the pattern of criminality came into effect on 6 March 2006. Additionally, the government will establish a new division within the Attorney-General's Department to coordinate background checking on people working in the secure areas of air and seaports
  • enhanced airside inspections. Since late 2005, industry and government agencies have been consulted on an effective airside screening regime. The intention is to inspect everyone going into airside areas immediately surrounding regular passenger transport aircraft at the 11 designated airports
  • appointed additional staff to audit regulated air cargo agents
  • provided explosive trace detection equipment to be used to examine export air cargo
  • initiated a project to develop a nationally consistent Aviation Security Training Framework in consultation with the aviation industry. The framework outlines security-specific knowledge and competencies for defined security roles and will include training modules and assessment materials
  • advised and worked closely with other agencies responsible for implementing the recommendations-and will continue to do so
  • continued to analyse transport security events and incidents in the aviation sector.

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