Output Group 2 : Regulatory, Investigative and Safety Services

Output 2.1 : Approvals and Monitoring of Directions, Rules and Regulations

1 : Airlines licensing and designation requirements

Area of Activity Performance Targets
  • Ensure all international airlines operating in Australia are aware of and meet licensing and designation requirements.
  • Implement airport designations, as required, including fixed time period designations for specific flights.
  • Provide an accessible service and timely advice to clients regarding dispensations for ad hoc cabotage operations.
  • Administer charter, timetable and tariff approvals pursuant to legislation and treaty obligations.
  • Monitor compliance of airlines, airports and international air cargo regulated agents with aviation security legislation.
Quality: In accordance with relevant directions, rules and/or regulations.

Quantity: There are 53 airlines licensed to operate services to and from Australia.

In relation to aviation security, monitor activities involving 66 airlines, 37 airports and 643 regulated international air cargo agents.

Process up to 20 airport designation applications annually.

Timeliness: Process all licensing applications from international airlines within 60 days of receipt.

Respond within five working days of receipt of application for fixed time period designations for specific flights.

Respond within 48 hours of receipt of application regarding dispensations for ad hoc cabotage operations.

Respond to charter, timetable and tariff approval applications within 30 days.

Provide formal aviation security advice to industry within 28 days of completion of audit to supplement oral advice at exit interviews.
Contributing Division(s): Aviation
Performance Achieved

As part of Australias commitments to the International Civil Aviation Organisation, the licensing of airlines ensures the safety of air services and access to the Australian market for international carriers as well as opening up international air service markets for Australian airlines.

Guidance material about licensing and designation requirements is available from the Departments website. Forty-nine airlines are currently operating international air services to and from Australia and a further 11 market seats on a code share basis only.

We responded to all requests relating to temporary designation applications within five working days.

We received four International Airline Licence applications. We finalised all within 60 days of receipt of the necessary documentation.

DOTARS provides an after-hours phone number for urgent cabotage dispensation requests. We processed 81 requests and responded to all within 48 hours.

We issued 29 temporary international airport designations to Australian airports.

We received and processed 205 applications for timetable approval, 175 applications to vary existing timetables, 134 tariff filings, six applications for passenger charter programs and four applications for freight charter programs. There were 15 applications to which we were unable to respond within 30 days.

Liberalised tariff provisions which provide for voluntary submission of tariff applications and automatic approval in the majority of cases came into effect in December 2000.

Security inspections were carried out on all international and major domestic airlines and categorised airports with security programs. Security assessments were also carried out at a number of regulated international cargo agent sites in 2000–01.

The 28 days airport/airline aviation security advice requirement was generally met except where further discussions with the industry necessitated extra time to finalise the Departments advice.

back to top

2 : Administer regulatory provisions for federal airports

Area of Activity Performance Targets
  • Airport environment standards and building standards, including provision of Airport Environment Officers and Airport Building Controllers.
Quality: Compliance of airport lessees with legislative requirements.

Statutory discretions exercised consistent with the purpose of the legislative requirements.
Quantity: 20 regulated airports.
Contributing Division(s): Airports
Performance Achieved

To facilitate an appropriate balance between the development of airports and the protection of environmental values, AEOs and ABCs helped ensure a high level of compliance by airport lessees with environmental and building standards. We managed 23 separate contracts for the provision of Airport Environment Officers and Airport Building Controllers who proactively monitored federal airports.

We undertook an extensive review and assessment of the annual environment report provided by each airport to determine performance in improving environmental outcomes against commitments given in the Airport Environment Strategies.

Competitive re-tender of the Airport Environment Officer function for the two-year period from 1 July 2001 (with a two-year option) was completed.

Environment strategies have been developed and approved for 20 regulated airports and compliance has been regularly monitored.

back to top

3 : Administer legislation and contract provisions

Area of Activity Performance Targets
  • Ownership.
  • Leases and licences.
  • On-airport commercial activity.
  • Airspace protection.
  • Payments in lieu of land tax.
Quality: Compliance of airport lessees with legislative and contractual requirements.

Statutory and administrative discretions exercised consistent with the purpose of the legislative requirements.

Quantity: 20 regulated airports.
Contributing Division(s): Airports
Performance Achieved

To promote airports that operate efficiently while meeting the needs of users and the general community and diversity in airport ownership while retaining Australian control, we continued our monitoring of compliance with the ownership provisions of the Airports Act and dealt with all applications submitted for approval of airport subleases or licences.

We ensured the continued protection of airspace around the leased federal airports by making timely decisions on applications for proposals which would affect that airspace, and by working closely with the airport operator companies to monitor compliance with the regulatory regime.

Ex gratia payments in lieu of land tax for leased federal airports received in 2000–01 totalled approximately $10.6 million. This includes $3.6 million for previous years.

Airports continue to comply with the provisions of the Airports Act.

back to top

4 : Administer a national parking regime at leased federal airports

Area of Activity Performance Targets
  • Leased federal airports.
Quality: Ensure motor vehicles comply with Australian road rules.

Quantity: 32 900 parking infringement notices.
Contributing Division(s): Airports
Performance Achieved

The new parking regime was implemented by the end of the 2000–01 financial year for seven major leased federal airports.

This establishes a uniform parking regime at those airports, with stronger disincentives for the more serious parking offences, while strengthening the airports accountability for their parking enforcement activities.

back to top

5 : Administer regulations governing aircraft noise emissions and airport curfews

Area of Activity Performance Targets
  • Aircraft noise emissions.
  • Airport curfews.
Quality: Compliance of aircraft operators with legislative requirements.Statutory discretions exercised consistent with legislative requirements.

Quantity: Administration of curfews at three airports.

Timeliness: Timing of decisions to recognise operational circumstances.
Contributing Division(s): Airports
Performance Achieved

To aid efficient aircraft operation consistent with protection of residential amenity, regulations were introduced on 7 June 2001 to impose a curfew and other controls on aircraft movements at Essendon Airport.

We also administered curfew arrangements at Sydney, Adelaide, Coolangatta and Essendon Airports, including exercising responsibility for ministerial dispensations and granted 43 curfew dispensations: 26 at Sydney, 14 at Adelaide and three at Coolangatta. We also administered and ensured compliance with the Air Navigation (Aircraft Noise) Regulations.

back to top

6 : Funding and staff support for the International Air Services Commission

Area of Activity Performance Targets
  • International Air Services Commission determinations on applications by Australian airlines for international route capacity available under bilateral air service arrangements.
Quality: In accordance with the International Air Services Commission Act 1992 and the Ministers policy statement.

Quantity: Approximately 25 determinations and/or decisions.

Timeliness: Average turnaround of applications is six weeks.
Contributing Division(s): Aviation
Performance Achieved

The International Air Services Commissions main function is to determine the outcomes of applications by existing and prospective international Australian airlines for capacity and route entitlements under bilateral air services arrangements. These determinations allocate the available passenger and freight capacity on a route to one or more carriers and set conditions for the use of the capacity.

The Commission has issued 48 final decisions or determinations and three draft decisions.

The overall turnaround time of applications, including contested cases, was 4.72 weeks.

back to top

7 : Manage the Australian Design Rule certification approval process for new and used vehicles first entering the Australian market

Area of Activity Performance Targets
  • Issue compliance plate and import application approvals.
  • Handle inquiries regarding vehicle imports.
Quality: Ensure all vehicles entering the Australian market for the first time meet the Australian Design Rules.

Client satisfaction with approval process and advice.

Quantity: Approximately 2900 compliance plate approvals and approximately 28 000 import approvals.

Approximately 60 000 incoming phone calls and approximately 15 000 outgoing calls.

Timeliness: In line with published Client Service Charter.
Contributing Division(s): Land Transport
Performance Achieved

One objective is to achieve appropriate levels of safety for passengers, transport workers, the general public and freight, and reduce the community cost of accidents. A second objective is to achieve responsible outcomes that reduce the impact of land transport on public health, community resources and the natural environment.

This regulatory activity aims to ensure all relevant vehicles comply with applicable Australian Design Rules.

Our Client Service Line had received two formal complaints and 12 written compliments as at 30 June 2001.

We issued 2371 compliance plate approvals and 25 001 vehicle import approvals.

We received 60 618 incoming calls from July 2000 to June 2001; information on the number of outgoing calls is not available.

Timeliness: We finalised 76 per cent of applications within 17 calendar days (branch service standard) and 95 per cent of applications within 20 working days in accordance with the Departments Service Charter.

back to top

8 : Monitor vehicle and vehicle component production compliance with safety, anti-theft and emission standards

Area of Activity Performance Targets
  • Assess laboratories for fitness to test to Australian Design Rule requirements.
  • Conduct/coordinate conformity of production assessments in Australia and overseas.
Quality: Government and industry satisfaction with conduct of, and results from, assessments and inspections.

Quantity: Approximately 40 conformity of production assessments and test facility inspections in Australia. Overseas agents conduct approximately 40 conformity of production and test facility inspections, with departmental staff in attendance at 10 of these.

Timeliness: In line with audit schedule agreed to with industry.
Contributing Division(s): Land Transport
Performance Achieved

Fifty overseas conformity of production assessments and test facility inspections were carried out; DOTARS staff attended 16 of these.

We carried out 17 local conformity of production assessments and test facility inspections.

back to top

9 : Develop procedures and administer UN ECE 1958 Agreement arrangements

Area of Activity Performance Targets
  • Supervision of tests.
  • Audits.
  • Issuing approvals.
Quality: Government and industry satisfaction with processes and approvals issued.

Timeliness: In accordance with schedule agreed to with industry.
Contributing Division(s): Land Transport
Performance Achieved

Further to sections 7 and 8 above, the aim is to encourage harmonised motor vehicle standards.

We held two meetings with industry to discuss priorities for the application of United Nations/Economic Commission of Europe (UN ECE) regulations and how best to administer the UN ECE 1958 Agreement.

back to top

10 : Administer the licence and permit requirements of Part VI of the Navigation Act 1912

Area of Activity Performance Targets
  • Part VI of the Navigation Act 1912.
Quality: Administer requirements in accordance with Part VI of the Navigation Act 1912 and administrative guidelines.

Timeliness: Permits and licence applications will be processed within two business days of their receipt.
Contributing Division(s): Cross-Modal & Maritime Transport
Performance Achieved

To ensure shippers have access to services we issued permits and licences in accordance with legislative requirements and ministerial guidelines.

We issued a total of 628 single voyage permits, 108 continuing voyage permits and 50 licences.

We processed permits and licences within two working days from receipt of all documentation.

During 2000–01 some 9.5 million tonnes of cargo were carried under single and continuous voyage permits.

back to top

11 : Administer Part X of the Trade Practices Act 1974

Area of Activity Performance Targets
  • Perform function of Registrar of Liner Shipping on application by industry, including register conference agreements, variations of agreements, Designated Shipper Bodies and Part X agents.
  • Provide advice to industry.
  • Attend Part X negotiations when authorised officer requested by shippers.
  • Move to online transactions.
  • Make registers viewable on the Departments website.
Quality: Administration to be performed in accordance with the requirements of the legislation, regulations and Ministerial Guidelines.

Quantity: Online transactions to be in operation from June 2001.

Timeliness: Legislative standard requires registering agreements within 14 days; transactions available online by 30 June 2001.
Contributing Division(s): Cross-Modal & Maritime Transport
Performance Achieved

Through the administration of Part X of the Trade Practices Act 1974 we promote conditions in international liner cargo shipping that encourage stable access to markets through shipping services of adequate frequency and reliability at internationally competitive freight rates for shippers in all States and Territories.

We performed the Registrar of Liner Shipping function in accordance with the legal requirements. Agreements were registered within the 14-day standard in all cases. We registered:
  • 32 new conference agreements (including 28 agreements relating to inwards liner cargo shipping, which from 2 March 2001 must be registered in order to receive exemptions under Part X);
  • 20 variations of existing agreements (including one relating to inwards liner cargo shipping); and
  • Part X agents for four shipping lines.
We provided advice to industry on an ad hoc basis.

In consultation with industry and the Australian Competition & Consumer Commission we prepared a plain English guide to the amended Part X of the Trade Practices Act 1974.

We developed procedures to improve negotiation arrangements aimed at achieving commercially acceptable solutions to problems between shipping conferences and exporters and importers.

Authorised officers attended eight negotiations between shippers and members of shipping conferences, at which issues concerning terminal handling charges, currency and bunker surcharges, and the transition to United States $ tariffs were negotiated.

We are developing online transactions in accordance with the Government Online Strategy. We have started to make reports from register databases viewable on the Departments website.

We implemented the extension of carriers Part X obligations to cover importers. In the role of Authorised Officers we assisted in negotiations that, under procedures set out in Part X, succeeded in resolving differences between shippers and carriers during 2000–01.

back to top

Output 2.2 : Safety and Security Investigations

12 : Air transport safety investigation services

Area of Activity Performance Targets
  • Publicly released individual occurrence reports resulting from air transport safety investigations.
  • Confidential Aviation Incident Reporting (CAIR) reports resulting in notifications of alert bulletins.
  • Aviation occurrence data analysis.
  • Aviation safety-related projects.
  • Investigation of safety deficiencies resulting in safety recommendations and safety advisory notices to the Civil Aviation Safety Authority, Airservices, other agencies and industry, addressing safety concerns arising from investigations.
Quality: Notifications of those actions which are considered sufficiently serious and on which appropriate safety actions are taken.

Acceptance of recommendations arising from aviation safety-related projects by aviation industry.

All data analysis projects result in publication of results. Requests for information are handled to the satisfaction of the person/organisation requesting.

Quantity: Capacity to investigate up to 40 safety deficiencies resulting in safety recommendations and safety advisory notices.

Capacity to publish up to 230 occurrence reports.

Capacity to issue up to 150 notifications resulting from CAIR reports. Capacity to undertake two aviation safety-related projects.

Capacity to undertake up to four data analysis projects.

Timeliness: Notifications of sufficiently serious incidents, from CAIR reports issued within 15 days of receipt.

Aviation safety-related projects completed within 12 months of commencement.

Each safety deficiency issue assessed and appropriately actioned within one month.

Investigation occurrence reports produced in accordance with International Civil Aviation Organization standards.
Contributing Division(s): Australian Transport Safety Bureau
Performance Achieved

Our investigative activities continued to contribute to the maintenance and improvement of safety for the travelling public and transport industry operations. In 2000–01 we:
  • issued 73 air safety recommendations to the Civil Aviation Safety Authority, Airservices Australia and other parties;
  • received 51 responses and accepted 23 responses (see Appendix F);
  • handled all requests for information to the satisfaction of the person/organisation requesting;
  • published 103 investigation occurrence reports. This outcome was well below the 230 ceiling primarily due to reclassification of minor category 4 incidents as category 5, which reduced the numbers of investigation reports generated;
  • issued 207 CAIR for your information notifications and 6 alert bulletins, well above the 150 ceiling, all within 15 days of receipt and most within three days;
  • completed two aviation occurrence data analysis projects;
  • published one aviation safety-related project within 12 months of commencement;
  • investigated 44 safety deficiencies resulting in safety recommendations and safety advisory notices; and
  • assessed, and commenced action on all safety deficiencies within one month of notification.

back to top

13 : Investigate maritime accidents/incidents

Area of Activity Performance Targets
  • Identify circumstances and establish causes.
Quality: Impartial investigations undertaken in accordance with legislation/regulations and procedural guidelines.

Quantity: Findings published in up to 15 reports and 6 presentations.

Timeliness: Median time of 27 weeks to complete investigations and finalise reports.
Contributing Division(s): Australian Transport Safety Bureau
Performance Achieved

The Marine Investigation Unit completed seven investigation reports and presented seven papers on maritime safety policy, safety investigations and related safety issues.

The median time of 44 weeks taken to complete reports exceeded the target of 27 weeks because the target was unrealistic.

back to top

14 : Investigate rail safety incidents

Area of Activity Performance Targets
  • Identify circumstances and establish causes.
Quality: Impartial investigations undertaken in accordance with relevant legislation/regulations and procedural guidelines.

Quantity: Findings published in up to four reports.

Timeliness: Median time of 27 weeks to complete investigations and finalise reports.
Contributing Division(s): Australian Transport Safety Bureau
Performance Achieved

We developed multi-modal safety investigation legislation which will enable the Australian Transport Safety Bureau to instigate rail investigations on the interstate system. State and territory opposition to the legislation delayed its introduction in the parliament. It is expected to be introduced in 2001–02.

We commenced rail investigations for the Victorian Government in April and May 2001 under Victorian legislation.

back to top

15 : International investigation of transport incidents and accidents

Area of Activity Performance Targets
  • Provide technical assistance to regional authorities.
Quality: Technical assistance which meets user requirements.

Quantity: Provision of limited (given the Australian Transport Safety Bureaus capacity) assistance as required.

Timeliness: Staged responses with individually agreed timeframes depending upon complexity and priority, given other commitments.
Contributing Division(s): Australian Transport Safety Bureau
Performance Achieved

Our assistance in international investigations leads to improved safety in our region and is undertaken in accordance with international road safety arrangements and national memoranda of understanding. In 2000–01 we:
  • contributed to 15 international investigations of transport accidents and incidents; and
  • responded to requests for technical assistance which satisfied the mutually agreed task definitions in terms of extent of analysis, mode of reporting and timeframe.

back to top

16 : Motor vehicle safety inspections and recalls

Area of Activity Performance Targets
  • Undertake vehicle defect investigations as required.
  • Monitor vehicle recalls.
Quality: Stakeholders have an increased awareness of vehicle safety.

Consumer Affairs Division is kept up-to-date on the status of vehicle recalls.

Quantity: Undertake up to 75 vehicle defect investigations.

Monitor the effectiveness of up to 85 safety recalls.

Timeliness: In line with agreed procedures for management of safety investigations.

In line with agreed procedures for monitoring of vehicle safety recalls.
Contributing Division(s): Australian Transport Safety Bureau
Performance Achieved

Our provision of expert assistance on motor vehicle safety to the Consumer Affairs Division of the Treasury aims to reduce manufacturers safety defects and improve consumer safety.

We undertook 51 vehicle safety investigations in line with agreed procedures. Vehicle safety investigation numbers depend on reports to the Bureau by vehicle users.

We monitored the effectiveness of 111 vehicle recalls in accordance with agreed procedures. Vehicle recall numbers were higher than expected, as vehicle manufacturers are increasingly proactive in instigating recalls due to higher consumer awareness.

We provided the Consumer Affairs Division of the Treasury with weekly updates of vehicle recall activity and the status of vehicle recalls is also updated regularly on the Bureaus website.

back to top

Financial Performance

Budget* $26.435m
Actual Outcome $27.824m
Variation 5.2%

* Budget reflects accrual estimates as opposed to cash estimates which were reported
in the Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements 2000–01.

The greater than budgeted expenditure is attributable to:

  • greater than expected demand for approval and monitoring of directions, rules and regulations associated with the aviation industry; and
  • increased expenditure for major accident preparedness areas for the Australian Transport Safety Bureau.

back to top

Multi-modal safety

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau has worked to establish itself as an exemplary multi-modal safety body such as those in Canada, United States of America, Sweden and the Netherlands. In January 2001, the Bureau was accepted as a member of the International Transportation Safety Association. The Bureau has actively continued work under its charter to integrate and share knowledge about key aspects of air, sea, rail and road transport safety activity through its 2000–01 strategic business plan.

The Bureau is furthering its multi-modal safety investigation role by assisting the Minister to develop Commonwealth multi-modal safety investigation legislation which is expected to be introduced later in 2001. This legislation will enable the Commonwealth to instigate rail safety investigations on the interstate rail system, as well as consolidate and update the Bureaus legislative framework for aviation and marine investigations.

The Bureau published its first annual review to improve accountability and access to key multi-modal safety material in October 2000. It continues to improve safety education and accountability in line with the Government Online Strategy through its website (http://www.atsb.gov.au/). The Bureau also continues to contribute an eight-page supplement to the Civil Aviation Authoritys bimonthly magazine, Flight Safety.

back to top