2018–19 Corporate Plan

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cover image of corporate plan 2018-2019

2018–19 Corporate Plan
PDF: 4449 KB ReadSpeaker

Secretary's introduction

It's my pleasure to introduce the Department of Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities 2018–19 Corporate Plan. This is our primary planning document, explaining our purposes, describing how we will measure our outcomes, and outlining the environment in which we work.

Our purpose statements show how the department's policy, program and investment programs contribute to supporting economic growth through transport; making travel safer; increasing transport access; supporting regional development, local communities and cities; and providing good governance in territories. This is a complex challenge and substantial program of work.

The department's work starts with effective planning, analysis and evidence. The department's Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics, in our Transport Group, is one of our greatest strengths. The Bureau's economic analysis, research and statistical outputs provide a strong foundation for our policy development. Making the right long-term choices for infrastructure, transport, regional development, cities and the territories is critical to ensuring that all Australians have the opportunity to enjoy the benefits of a strong and prosperous economy.

Our Infrastructure Group manages the government's infrastructure investment program, supporting the $75 billion 10-year infrastructure plan for Australia. This includes the $10 billion Melbourne to Brisbane Inland Rail project and the $5.3 billion Western Sydney Airport.

For cities policy, the government's Smart Cities Plan is our guiding framework. The plan recognises that great cities attract talent and investment, encourage innovation and create jobs. Part of the plan is to establish governance frameworks that build a shared commitment to our cities' futures, and our work to broker city deals contributes directly to this outcome.

Our Transport Group leads our strategic policy work, including partnering with state and territory governments to deliver a national freight and supply chain strategy, and negotiating air services agreements that support the liberalisation of freight and a growing economy. The work supports infrastructure investment decisions for a user-focused approach to road services, while keeping pace with transformative transport technological changes. With the right regulatory settings in place, the technology of the future will support safer, more efficient, and more sustainable travel.

Our Regional and Territories Group supports communities to strengthen local government and territory government capacity, to drive regional growth and build stronger communities. Regional development includes our focus on water infrastructure. During 2018–19 we will support the delivery of water infrastructure commitments, including the $580 million National Water Infrastructure Development Fund.

External territories are home to some of the nation's most remote communities, which can make delivering services and infrastructure a unique challenge that requires targeted efforts. We support citizens in the external territories and the Jervis Bay Territory to have access to services similar to mainland communities through good governance and improving the overarching legislative framework.

Our work will contribute to Australia's implementation of the United Nation's Sustainable Development Goal 9: Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation, and Sustainable Development Goal 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable.

I am confident that our department is well positioned to deliver quality policy advice, programs and regulatory functions to support our purposes and outcomes. Our corporate plan sets our vision with six elements that capture the essence of the capabilities we need to do our job:

  • having a view on the right outcome
  • driving policy reform
  • leading program and project delivery
  • regulating effectively
  • being a leading entity for investment strategy and planning
  • fostering a high performing workforce

These six elements will guide us in building capability across the department as we work to deliver the activities outlined in this plan over the year ahead.

Dr Steven Kennedy PSM
Secretary

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Purposes

The Department of Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities is responsible for the design and implementation of the Australian Government's infrastructure, transport, regional development, cities and territories policies, programs, and regulations. As the diagram highlights, our purposes deliver four outcomes across our budget programs.

We support the government in achieving a strong economy and thriving communities now and for the future.

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Delivering our activities in 2018–19

To achieve the purposes outlined in our corporate plan, we will administer funding of $9.6 billion on behalf of the government in 2018–19 across our programs. The chart below highlights key figures and administered items above $75 million.

Further information is available in the 2018–19 Portfolio Budget Statements for the Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities portfolio.

2018–19 Program funding—including key items over $75 million

Program
1.1 Infrastructure Investment $605.0m
Investment Program (Investment) $138.9m
Investment Program (Roads to Recovery) $364.8m
National Partnership Payment (Infrastructure Investment) $5548.0m
Black Spot projects $85.0m
Bridges Renewal Program $85.0m
Infrastructure Growth Package—new investments $81.3m
Northern Australia Roads $231.7m
Rail investment component $752.7m
Road investment component $3694.6m
Western Sydney Infrastructure Plan $386.9m
2.2 Surface Transport $432.6m
Tasmanian Freight Equalisation Scheme $172.6m
2.3 Road Safety $4.0m
2.4 Air Transport $339.9m
Sydney West Airport—site management $118.9m
3.1 Regional Development $1017.5m
Building Better Regions Fund $232.5m
Community Development Grants $378.8m
National Stronger Regions Fund $177.9m
Regional Jobs and Investment Packages $124.3m
National Partnership Payment (Regional Development) $176.9m
National Water Infrastructure Development Fund $105.8m
3.2 Local Government $1249.0m
Financial Assistance Grants $1229.0m
3.3 Cities $25.0m
4.1 Services to Territories $198.1m
Services to Indian Ocean Territories $108.5m

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Measuring our performance

The evolution of our performance measurement

The enhanced Commonwealth performance framework took effect in July 2015, with a focus on supporting accountability and high standards of performance. Since we adopted the framework in 2015–16, we have continually refined the way we communicate our efforts and achievements. In the framework's first year, we reported the activities that we had undertaken towards our purposes. In 2016–17 and 2017–18, we developed measures that were outcome-focused and that assessed performance directly against each of our purposes. We have further refined these measures for 2018–19 to achieve a greater balance between outcome measures (which the department contributes to, but are also reliant on contributions from other stakeholders) and the articulation of our budget program outputs to better demonstrate the department's overall performance.

Success measures

A number of our performance measures are effectiveness measures, which reflect our purposes. We have deliberately set targets against purpose-level measures above what we would be able to achieve alone, recognising the contributions of other Australian Government departments and agencies, state, territory and local governments, and industry. The remaining measures provide detail on our role and the outputs we contribute that influence the achievement of the purpose-level measures.

Continual improvement

While our performance measurement has evolved, we have always focused on our core purposes: improving the efficiency, sustainability and safety of our transport systems; increasing access to these systems; working for stronger communities for all Australians; and providing good governance in the territories. Over the forward years of this plan, we will continue to evolve our targets and measures that show the department's contributions to achieving our purposes and outcomes.

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Activities

Outcome 1—Improved infrastructure across Australia through investment in and coordination of transport and other infrastructure

Increasing transport access

Connecting people, communities, businesses and markets

Making travel safer

Minimising the number and severity of transport safety incidents

Supporting economic growth through transport

Improving transport efficiency and sustainability to facilitate the movement of people and freight

Supporting regional development, local communities and cities

Delivering jobs and economic growth for regional Australia and improving standards of living through influencing policy, investing in infrastructure and building community capability

Several of our divisions contribute to improving infrastructure across Australia by facilitating investment that supports efficiency, access and safety of Australia's land transport infrastructure. This strengthens the Australian economy by improving connectivity of communities and freight, contributing to delivering jobs, improving living standards and building opportunities across Australia

Environment

By managing the government's infrastructure investment, we play a critical role to ensure our transport systems are efficient and sustainable, support economic growth, and respond to growing freight and commuter needs. In 2017–18, Australia's total population is estimated to have grown by around 350,000 people, with much of that growth concentrated in our cities. We develop sustainable long-term infrastructure planning and investment strategies that improve access, safety, connectivity and local development. This optimises the impact of public investment in infrastructure and supports growth and productivity. We collaborate across all levels of government and industry to inform future investment priorities.

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Program 1.1—Infrastructure Investment

The infrastructure investment program supports economic growth, makes travel safer, increases transport access and supports regional development. It increases the efficiency, productivity, sustainability and safety of Australia's land transport infrastructure through programs and policy to improve connectivity for communities and freight.

Over the forward years of this plan, we will:

  • manage the government's infrastructure investment programs to deliver efficiency-enhancing road and rail projects, in partnership with state, territory and local governments
  • develop options and provide policy advice to optimise the impact of infrastructure investment, including on:
    • potential priority projects
    • funding and financing
    • land transport market reforms
Key activities2018–192019–202020–212021–22
Effectively manage the infrastructure investment program, including implementing:
  • road and rail commitments made in the states and territories through the 2018–19 Budget
  • the government's land transport sub-programs—roads to recovery, black spot, bridges renewal and the heavy vehicle safety and productivity programs
  • concessional loan agreements
active
active
active
active
Develop the negotiating strategy for the new National Partnership Agreement (NPA), including an Indigenous Employment Participation framework, and leading negotiations with state and territory transport officials and relevant Commonwealth agencies
active
active
Provide strategic advice to government on infrastructure policy issues, including:
  • detailed project reviews and advice on implementation options for land transport projects
  • establishing governance arrangements for Roads of Strategic Importance, the Urban Congestion Fund and Major Business Case Fund
  • implementing the government's role as an informed investor to ensure value for money
  • managing governance arrangements for Infrastructure Australia and the Infrastructure Project Financing Agency
active
active
active
active
Work in partnership with state and territory governments and industry to implement heavy vehicle road reform and investigate pathways towards full market reform
active
active
active
active
Undertake cost estimate, assurance and compliance reviews to improve transport infrastructure decision-making and delivery in partnership with the jurisdictions (note: activities beyond 2018–19 are subject to the approval of further funding)
active
partially active
partially active
partially active
Oversee delivery of the Melbourne to Brisbane Inland Rail
active
active
active
active
Oversee the Melbourne Airport Rail Link business case
active
active
Identify opportunities and maximise the benefits of inland rail for industry and local communities during construction and operations
active
active
active
active
Complete three faster rail business cases
active
active
Complete Urban Rail Plans for Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth and Adelaide
active
active
Progress national rail policy reform to ensure efficient and effective rail investments and markets
active
active
active
active
Success measures

In delivering our key activities we will influence our success measures which align to the program outcome and our departmental purposes. The targets we set are influenced by the contributions of other Australian Government departments and agencies, state, territory and local governments, and industry. Our department has included departmental outputs and targets to show this.

What will be measured?Departmental contribution to the measureWho benefits?TargetData sources and methodology
2018–192019–202020–212021–22
1. Volume of freight 1.1 Effective administration of investment in road infrastructure

1.2 Effective administration of investment in rail infrastructure

1.3 The percentage of road
projects with government funding of $100 million or more that have been subject to a business case assessment (target 100%)

1.4 The percentage of rail projects with government funding of $100 million or more that have been subject to a business case assessment (target 100%)
All Australians 10-year average to 2016–17 is
>603.1btkm
(10-year average to 2015–16)
Increased 10-year rolling average Source: BITRE Australian Infrastructure Yearbook
Methodology: BITRE data analysis
2. Expected travel time savings arising from road projects in the infrastructure investment program receiving $400 million or more in Australian Government funding 2.1 Effective administration of investment in road infrastructure

2.2 The percentage of road projects with government funding of $400 million or more that have been subject to a business case assessment (target 100%)
Road users Reduced travel times Source: Project proposal and post-completion reports
Methodology: Time savings will be measured as the total expected time savings benefits (in $) of projects carried out in the financial year
3. Community understanding of road funding issues 3.1 The proportion of Australia's roads included in the Transport and Infrastructure Council Heavy Vehicle Asset Registers (target: increased proportion compared to previous financial year) All Australians Increased proportion compared to previous financial year Source: State Government Road Asset Management Systems into the Heavy Vehicle Asset Registers
Methodology: Department analysis of Heavy Vehicle Asset Registers
4. Number of road fatalities 4.1 Effective administration of investment in road infrastructure

4.2 The percentage of road vehicle standards which are harmonised with international standards (>90% harmonised with international standards)
Road users 1,053* or fewer fatalities 1,016* or fewer fatalities—fatalities continue to reduce Source: BITRE Australian Road Deaths Database
Methodology: BITRE data analysis
5. Serious injuries due to road crashes 5.1 Effective administration of investment in road infrastructure

5.2 The percentage of road vehicle standards which are harmonised with international standards (>90% harmonised with international standards)
Road users Establish a baseline Serious injuries due to road crashes reduce, relative to 2019–20 baseline Source: Departmental records
Methodology: To report in 2018–19, the department will describe activities completed towards establishing a framework to measure serious injuries due to road crashes and assess whether it is on track for 2019–20
6. Number of rail fatalities 6.1 Effective administration of investment in rail infrastructure Rail users Rail fatalities reduce, relative to 2017–18 baseline Source: Office of the National Rail Safety Regulator (ONRSR)
Methodology: BITRE analysis of ONRSR data
7. Expected number of jobs supported over the life of projects, from infrastructure investment and regional development projects underway during the financial year (based on proponent reported data) 7.1 Effective administration of investment in road infrastructure

7.2 Effective administration of investment in rail infrastructure

7.3 Effective administration of investment through the regional development program
Jobseekers No target set: as part of the development of the next NPA for land transport projects, the department will work with state and territory governments to gain more data on jobs created by investment, including in relation to Indigenous employment and supplier use targets** Source: Project proponents' proposal reports and other relevant information
Methodology: Departmental data analysis

* The figure of 1,053 reflects the number of fatalities that would mean Australia was on-track to achieve the objective of the National Road Safety Strategy 2011–2020, which is to reduce deaths by at least 30% on the 2008–10 figures by 2020

** The department recognises that infrastructure investment is a key driver of job creation across a range of industries throughout the life cycle of each project. Jobs depend on the scale and complexity of the project, and the schedule of project delivery

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Outcome 2—An efficient, sustainable, competitive and safe transport system for all transport users through regulation, financial assistance and safety investigations

Increasing transport access

Connecting people, communities, businesses and markets

Making travel safer

Minimising the number and severity of transport safety incidents

Supporting economic growth through transport

Improving transport efficiency and sustainability to facilitate the movement of people and freight

Australia's prosperity relies on a transport system that is efficient, sustainable, competitive, safe and productive. Our divisions working towards outcome two help to improve the transport sector's performance for the benefit of all Australians. This is achieved by supporting national transport reform, connecting Australians with domestic markets and connecting the nation to the global economy, to support safe and effective long-term growth and competitiveness

Environment

Road, rail, maritime and air transport are critical to connect people with their jobs, communities and essential services. We work to facilitate increased access and reduce the number and severity of safety incidents across all transport modes by managing the government's infrastructure investment, surface transport and air transport budget programs. The department works to reduce the number and severity of safety incidents across all transport modes by managing the government's surface transport, road safety and air transport budget programs.

Transport policy and safety is a complex environment and there is a diverse range of external factors that can have a powerful effect. These factors include the demands of our growing population and increasing freight volumes, the spatial distribution of communities and the policies of other key infrastructure investors—including industry as well as state, territory and local governments. We share this responsibility with other government transport agencies as well as industry (including unions), and state, territory and local governments. We work closely with stakeholders to achieve these purposes.

Through our international memberships, including the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE), World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations (WP.29), the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), we advance Australia's interests in transport and contribute to global developments.

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Program 2.21—Surface Transport

The surface transport budget program makes travel safer by delivering programs, policies and regulation for safer road, rail and maritime sectors.

Over the forward years of this plan, we will:

  • provide analysis and policy advice in relation to:
    • efforts by the national rail, heavy vehicle and maritime regulators to deliver outcomes that improve transport productivity and safety
    • the operation of national road, rail and maritime markets
    • licencing and registration arrangements for heavy vehicles and maritime operators
    • coastal freight regulation, the Tasmanian transport schemes, Part X of the Competition and Consumer Act 2010, and the Shipping Reform (Tax Incentives) Act 2012
    • access to public transport for people with a disability
    • legislative governance and reporting requirements for surface transport entities
  • influence global developments in the transport sector by engaging with the International Maritime Organization (IMO), United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE), World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations (WP.29), Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)
  • encourage the trialling and adoption of new technologies which improve efficiency, sustainability, and safety, including automated and connected vehicles
  • maintain the regulatory framework for an efficient, environmentally sustainable surface transport system that can meet projected growth

1 Note: Program 2.1 Transport Security is now administered by the Department of Home Affairs

Key activities2018–192019–202020–212021–22
Contribute to the Productivity Commission review of the national transport reforms in 2019
active
Support the Ministerial Forum on Vehicle Emissions to coordinate a whole-of-Australian-government approach to addressing vehicle emissions, including testing and reporting arrangements
active
active
Progress the development of the maritime greenhouse gas reduction strategy at the International Maritime Organization
active
active
active
Progress legislative amendments to the Coastal Trading (Revitalising Australian Shipping) Act 2012
active
active
Implement a national infrastructure data collection and dissemination plan to improve the way infrastructure data is collected, shared and used to guide decision making
active
active
active
active
Develop a national freight and supply chain strategy for consideration by the Transport and Infrastructure Council in 2019
active
Support the strategic work program of the Transport and Infrastructure Council to implement the National Policy Framework for Land Transport Technology to ensure Australia is able to realise the full benefits of emerging transport technologies
active
active
active
active
Success measures

In delivering our key activities we will influence our success measures which align to the program outcome and our departmental purposes. The targets we set are influenced by the contributions of other Australian Government departments and agencies, state, territory and local governments, and industry. Our department has included departmental outputs and targets to show this.

What will be measured?Departmental contribution to the measureWho benefits?TargetData sources and methodology
2018–192019–202020–212021–22
8. Volume of freight 8.1 Effective administration of investment in road infrastructure

8.2 Effective administration of investment in rail infrastructure

8.3 Delivery of the freight and supply chain inquiry

8.4 Funding assistance provided to shippers through the Tasmanian Freight Equalisation Scheme
All Australians 10-year average to 2016–17 is >603.1btkm (10-year average to 2015–16) Increased 10-year rolling average Source: BITRE Australian
Infrastructure Yearbook
Methodology: BITRE data analysis
9. Transport CO2 equivalent emissions 9.1 Bilateral and multilateral engagements with identified states (and international forums) to encourage technical, operational and economic measures for reducing global emissions

9.2 Agreement and implementation of international arrangements to address emissions from international aviation
All Australians 10-year average to 2017–18 is <91,012 gigagrams (10-year average to 2015–16) Decreased 10-year rolling average Source: BITRE Australian Infrastructure Yearbook
Methodology: BITRE data analysis
10. Number of road fatalities 10.1 Effective administration of investment in road infrastructure

10.2 The percentage of road vehicle standards which are harmonised with international standards

10.3 Provide national leadership through the Transport and Infrastructure Council
All Australians 1,053*
or fewer fatalities
1,016* or fewer fatalities—fatalities continue to reduce Source: BITRE Australian Road Deaths Database
Methodology: BITRE data analysis
11. Serious injuries due to road crashes 11.1 Effective administration of investment in road infrastructure

11.2 The percentage of road vehicle standards which are harmonised with international standards (>90% harmonised with international standards)

11.3 Provide national leadership through the Transport and Infrastructure Council
All Australians Establish a baseline Serious injuries due to road crashes reduce, relative to 2019–20 baseline Source: Departmental records
Methodology: To report in 2018–19, the department will describe activities completed towards establishing a framework to measure serious injuries due to road crashes, and assess whether it is on track for 2019–20
12. Number of rail fatalities 12.1 Effective administration of investment in rail infrastructure Rail users Rail fatalities reduce, relative to 2017–18 baseline Source: Office of the National Rail Safety Regulator (ONRSR)
Methodology: BITRE analysis of ONRSR data

* The figure of 1,053 reflects the number of fatalities that would mean Australia was on-track to achieve the objective of the National Road Safety Strategy 2011–2020, which is to reduce deaths by at least 30% on the 2008–10 figures by 2020

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Program 2.3—Road Safety

The road safety budget program makes travel safer by coordinating a national strategic approach to improving road safety and working to make vehicles safer for all road users. This budget program is linked to Program 1.1 Infrastructure Investment and Program 2.2 Surface Transport. Together these programs deliver road safety outcomes and a national strategic approach to improving road safety and working to make vehicles safer for all road users.

Over the forward years of this plan we will:

  • improve road safety outcomes through government spending on infrastructure and manage the government's road safety agenda, including developing options and providing policy advice on:
    • the National Road Safety Strategy
    • vehicle safety standards
    • maintaining a proportionate, risk based policy approach to vehicle safety systems
  • work with state and territory governments to coordinate delivery arrangements for the National Road Safety Strategy 2011–2020 and National Road Safety Action Plan 2018–2020 through the Transport and Infrastructure Council
  • maintain the regulatory framework for the supply of safe vehicles to the Australian market
Key activities2018–192019–202020–212021–22
Work with the state and territory governments to coordinate delivery arrangements for the National Road Safety Strategy 2011–2020 and the National Road Safety Action Plan 2018–2020 through the Transport and Infrastructure Council
active
active
active
Support and lead the response into the independent inquiry of the National Road Safety Strategy 2011–2020
active
active
Maintain the regulatory framework for the supply of safe vehicles to the Australian market
active
active
active
active
Manage the government's road safety programs and develop policy advice
active
active
active
active
Success measures

In delivering our key activities we will influence our success measures which align to the program outcome and our departmental purposes. The targets we set are influenced by the contributions of other Australian Government departments and agencies, state, territory and local governments, and industry. Our department has included departmental outputs and targets to show this.

What will be measured?Departmental contribution to the measureWho benefits?TargetData sources and methodology
2018–192019–202020–212021–22
13. Number of road fatalities 13.1 Effective administration of investment in road infrastructure

13.2 The percentage of road vehicle standards which are harmonised with international standards (>90% harmonised with international standards)

13.3 Coordination of the National Road Safety Action Plan 2018–20 through the Transport and Infrastructure Council
All Australians 1,053* or fewer fatalities 1,016* or fewer fatalities Fatalities continue to reduce Source: BITRE Australian Road Deaths Database
Methodology: BITRE data analysis
14. Serious injuries due to road crashes 14.1 Effective administration of investment in road infrastructure

14.2 The percentage of road vehicle standards which are harmonised with international standards (>90% harmonised with international standards)

14.3 Coordination of the National Road Safety Action Plan 2018–20 through the Transport and Infrastructure Council
All Australians On track to have source data and establish a baseline by 2019–20 Establish a baseline Serious injuries due to road crashes reduce, relative to 2019–20 baseline Source: Departmental records
Methodology: To report in 2018–19, the department will describe activities completed towards establishing a framework to measure serious injuries due to road crashes, and assess whether it is on track for 2019–20

* The figure of 1,053 reflects the number of fatalities that would mean Australia was on-track to achieve the objective of the National Road Safety Strategy 2011–2020, which is to reduce deaths by at least 30% on the 2008–10 figures by 2020

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Program 2.4—Air Transport

The air transport budget program makes travel safer by ensuring the aviation industry operates within a clear and robust safety, planning and environmental regulatory framework.

Over the forward years of this plan we will:

  • manage the government's air transport programs, including overseeing the development of the Western Sydney Airport, maintaining active membership in the International Civil Avation Organization (ICAO) and developing and implementing capacity building programs with our neighbouring economies
  • develop options and provide policy advice on promoting safe air transport and supporting investment in safe aviation infrastructure
  • work with our portfolio agencies to maintain the regulatory framework for a competitive, sustainable, safe international and domestic air transport system
Key activities2018–192019–202020–212021–22
Lead preparations for the 2018 ICAO Air Navigation Conference and 2019 General Assembly
active
active
Work closely with stakeholders to progress the necessary land acquisitions and manage broader implications of the Third Runway Project at Melbourne Airport
active
active
Contribute to the Productivity Commission's Inquiry into the Economic Regulation of Airports
active
active
Engage with the National Airports Safeguarding Advisory Group to progress key elements of the National Airports Safeguarding Framework to ensure the safety of aviation operations and communities in the vicinity of airports
active
active
active
active
Contribute to whole-of-government activities to address per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) contamination and support the management of PFAS legacy and loss of contaminment events at federally-leased airports and other sites within the portfolio
active
active
active
active
Provide capacity building assistance to Indonesia and Papua New Guinea to improve transport safety and security outcomes
active
active
Provide airspace and air traffic management policy advice including on the next Australian Airspace Policy Statement and Instrument Flight Procedures policy
active
Progress the Western Sydney Airport and Western Sydney City Deal and related developments
active
active
active
active
Participate in the development of ICAO's Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation by overseeing its implementation in Australia and supporting practical measures taken by Australia's international airlines and regional partners in their implementation
active
active
active
Continue to pursue more liberalised bilateral air services arrangements focusing on those countries where capacity constraints exist
active
active
active
active
Success measures

In delivering our key activities we will influence our success measures which align to the program outcome and our departmental purposes. The targets we set are influenced by the contributions of other Australian Government departments and agencies, state, territory and local governments, and industry. Our department has included departmental outputs and targets to show this.

What will be measured?Departmental contribution to the measureWho benefits?TargetData sources and methodology
2018–192019–202020–212021–22
15. Volume of freight 15.1 Effective administration of investment in air transport infrastructure

15.2 Administration of regulatory and policy arrangements for airports is proportionate and risk based
All Australians 10-year average to 2016–17 is >603.1btkm (10-year average to 2015–16) Increased 10-year rolling average Source: BITRE Australian Infrastructure Yearbook
Methodology: BITRE data analysis
16 Transport CO2
equivalent emissions
16.1 Bilateral and multilateral engagements with identified states (and international forums) to encourage implementation of technical, operational and economic measures for reducing global emissions

16.2 Agreement and implementation of international arrangements to address emissions from international aviation
All Australians 10-year average to 2017–18 is <91,012 gigagrams (10-year average to 2015–16) Decreased 10-year rolling average Source: BITRE Australian Infrastructure Yearbook
Methodology: BITRE data analysis
17. Passenger movements, aviation sector 17.1 Increased capacity as a result of major airport development plans processed

17.2 Air services agreements negotiated

17.3 Support the main construction works for the stage 1 development of Western Sydney Airport in 2019

17.4 Administration of regulatory and policy arrangements for airports is proportionate and risk based
Transport users Increased 10-year rolling average Source: BITRE domestic and international aviation statistics
Methodology: BITRE data analysis
18. Number of aviation fatalities 18.1 Updated Australian Airspace Policy Statement in place

18.2 Aviation policy recommendations by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) are actioned

18.3 Administration of regulatory and policy arrangements for airports is proportionate and risk based
Transport users 10-year average to 2017 is <40 fatalities
(10-year average to 2016)
Decreased 10-year rolling average Source: ATSB records
Methodology: BITRE analysis of ATSB data
19. Level of aviation capacity (passenger and freight) available to major city airports under Australia's air services arrangements 19.1 Increased capacity as a result of airport major development plans processed

19.2 The proportion of increased capacity negotiated in respective air services arrangements
Transport users Increased compared to previous year Source: Departmental records on air services arrangements, including the Register of Available Capacity
Methodology: Departmental data analysis
20. Level of aviation capacity (passenger and freight) available in international aviation markets under Australia's air services arrangements 20.1 Air services agreements negotiated Transport users Increased compared to previous year Source: Departmental records on air services arrangements, including the Register of Available Capacity
Methodology: Departmental data analysis
21. Opportunities available to Australian airlines in international aviation markets 21.1 Air services agreements negotiated Transport users Increased compared to previous year Source: Departmental records on air services arrangements, including the Register of Available Capacity
Methodology: Departmental data analysis
22. Number of remote communities that receive support from the department for aerodrome infrastructure projects and air services 22.1 Funding assistance provided to airlines serving remote communities through the Airservices Australia's enroute charges payment scheme People in regional areas Maintained or increased compared to previous year Source: Monthly reports from each airline contracted to provide designated services, detailing services and locations Methodology: Departmental data analysis

Outcome 3—Strengthening the sustainability, capacity and diversity of our cities and regional economies including through facilitating local partnerships between all levels of government and local communities; through reforms that stimulate economic growth; and providing grants and financial assistance

Supporting regional development, local communities and cities

Delivering jobs and economic growth for regional Australia and improving standards of living through influencing policy, investing in infrastructure and building community capability

Our future prosperity depends upon government, business and the Australian community working together to support our cities, big and small. We facilitate partnerships between government and local communities that help create jobs, drive economic growth and build stronger regional communities

Environment

Regional Australia represents a third of our economy and is home to around 8 million people. At the same time Australia's growing population is concentrated in our cities. This is why the sustainability, capacity and diversity of our cities and regions require adaptive policies and investment strategies.

We support regional development, cities and local communities by managing the government's infrastructure investment, national water infrastructure development, air transport, regional development and local government budget programs. We provide regional policy leadership and a whole-of-government perspective to issues affecting regional Australia.

The drivers of wellbeing in our regions and cities are highly complex; our regions are diverse and changes to the national economy can affect individual regions in different ways. We share this responsibility with state, territory and local governments and other local stakeholders, and we work closely with them to achieve this purpose.

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Program 3.1 Regional development

The regional development budget program supports regional development and local communities through regionally focused stakeholder consultation and engagement, research, policy development and program delivery activities to create jobs, drive regional economic growth and build stronger regional communities.

Over the forward years of this plan we will:

  • manage the government's regional development programs to deliver projects which support the economic growth and liveability of regions
  • develop options and provide policy advice on developing regional Australia, including on:
    • enabling communities to drive their own futures
    • building more resilient local economies
Key activities2018–192019–202020–212021–22
Lead on policy development and implementation of regional deals
active
active
active
active
Deliver the 2019 Regional Ministerial Budget Statement, as well as subsequent annual Regional Ministerial Budget Statements
active
partially active
partially active
partially active
Deliver Round 3 of the Building Better Regions Fund, the Regional Growth Fund and Round 4 of the Stronger Communities Program
active
active
Deliver water infrastructure commitments, including the $580 million National Water Infrastructure Development Fund and $2 billion National Water Infrastructure Loan Facility, and manage arrangements for the Regional Investment Corporation to deliver water loans
active
active
active
active
Support Regional Development Australia Committees to maximise their effectiveness
active
active
active
active
Maintain a regional evidence base to support policy that tracks trends and issues relevant to the development of Australia's regions, including through the Progress in Australian Regions series, to inform communities and influence regional policy decisions
active
active
active
active
Success measures

In delivering our key activities we will influence our success measures which align to the program outcome and our departmental purpose. The targets we set are influenced by the contributions of other Australian Government departments and agencies, state, territory and local governments, and industry. Our department has included departmental outputs and targets to show this.

What will be measured?Departmental contribution to the measureWho benefits?TargetData sources and methodology
2018–192019–202020–212021–22
23. Number of employed persons outside capital cities 23.1 Effective administration of investment through the regional development programs

23.2 The number of public sector jobs outside of central Sydney, central Melbourne and Canberra

23.3 Maximise the effectiveness of Regional Development Australia Committees operating throughout Australia
People outside capital cities Increased compared to previous year Source: ABS 2017, Labour Force, Australia, Detailed Electronic Delivery, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.001
Methodology: BITRE analysis of data
24. Real disposable income for low and middle income households outside capital cities 24.1 Effective administration of investment through the regional development programs

24.2 Maximise the effectiveness of Regional Development Australia Committees operating throughout Australia
People in low and middle income households outside capital cities Increased from 2015–16 to 2017–18 Increase from 2017–18 to 2018–19 Source: Data published every two years in ABS Cat. No. 6523.0—Household Income and Wealth Australia
Methodology: BITRE analysis of data
25. Expected number of jobs supported over the life of projects, from infrastructure investment and regional development projects underway during the financial year (based on proponent reported data) 25.1 Effective administration of investment in road infrastructure

25.2 Effective administration of investment in rail infrastructure

25.3 Effective administration of investment through the regional development programs
Jobseekers No target set: as part of the development of the next NPA for land transport projects, the department will work with state and territory governments to gain more data on jobs created by investment, including in relation to Indigenous employment and supplier-use targets* Source: Project proponents' proposal reports and other relevant information
Methodology: Departmental data analysis
26. Increase in water available (ML) through water infrastructure projects funded 26.1 Management of National Water Infrastructure Development Fund

26.2 Management of National Water Infrastructure Loans Facility
People in regional areas Water available is increased Source: Data from water infrastructure projects funded
Methodology: Departmental data analysis

* The department recognises that infrastructure investment is a key driver of job creation across a range of industries, throughout the lifecycle of each project. It is difficult to set targets as the timing of those jobs depends on the scale and complexity of the project, and the schedule of project delivery

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Program 3.2 Local government

The local government budget program supports regional development and local communities by delivering policy advice to the government. Financial assistance is also provided to local governments to strengthen their capacity and better support local communities.

Over the forward years of this plan we will:

  • manage the government's local government programs including the Financial Assistance Grants program and the National Awards for Local Government
  • provide policy advice on local government
Key activities2018–192019–202020–212021–22
Deliver and manage the financial assistance grant program in accordance with the Local Government (Financial Assistance) Act 1995 to provide financial assistance which supports equitable levels of local government services delivery
active
active
active
active
Administer the National Awards for Local Government to recognise, reward and promote the innovative work of local governments across Australia, as well as subsequent National Awards for Local Government
active
partially active
partially active
partially active
Success measures

In delivering our key activities we will influence our success measures which align to the program outcome and our departmental purpose. The targets we set are influenced by the contributions of other Australian Government departments and agencies, state, territory and local governments, and industry. Our department has included departmental outputs and targets to show this.

What will be measured?Departmental contribution to the measureWho benefits?TargetData sources and methodology
2018–192019–202020–212021–22
27. Financial assistance is provided to support equitable levels of service by local government bodies 27.1 Management of funding provided through the Financial Assistance Grant program for local government bodies All Australians Financial assistance is provided in accordance with the Local Government (Financial Assistance) Act 1995 Source: Departmental records
Methodology: ANAO audit

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Program 3.3 Cities

The cities budget program supports cities through programs and policy to increase the productivity, accessibility and liveability of our cities, big and small.

Over the forward years of this plan we will:

  • continue to deliver the government's Smart Cities Plan, by:
    • bringing together three levels of government, the community and private enterprise to create place based partnerships, which focus on aligning planning, investment and governance to accelerate growth and job creation, stimulate urban renewal and drive economic reforms
    • delivering the government's smart cities and suburbs program
  • provide informed, consistent and influential advice to key stakeholders, including Ministers, on the government's cities agenda, through:
    • consultation and strategy for future city deals, including the provision of advice to the government
    • monitoring the performance of Australian cities through the national cities performance framework
Key activities2018–192019–202020–212021–22
Lead on cities policy coordination and enable collaboration to support delivery of city deals
active
active
active
active
Accelerate the take up of smart technology through the delivery of Round 2 of the smart cities and suburbs program
active
active
Contribute to the government's 2018 voluntary national review against the Sustainable Development Goals and report on relevant indicators showing domestic progress for goals 9 and 11
active
active
active
active
Contribute economic analysis and advice towards development of place-based policy, including consideration of how population growth will affect cities, regions and infrastructure
active
active
active
active
Success measures

In delivering our key activities we will influence our success measures which align to the program outcome and our departmental purpose. The targets we set are influenced by the contributions of other Australian Government departments and agencies, state, territory and local governments, and industry. Our department has included departmental outputs and targets to show this.

What will be measured?Departmental contribution to the measureWho benefits?TargetData sources and methodology
2018–192019–202020–212021–22
28. Enhanced coordination of investment in Australian cities 28.1 Commonwealth, state and local government investment leveraged through city deals

28.2 Funding leveraged through the Smart Cities and Suburbs Program
People in Australian cities No target set. Future City Deals to be determined by government Source: Departmental records
Methodology:
Departmental data analysis
29. Employment growth in cities 29.1 City Deals brokered

29.2 Projects approved to receive funding through the Smart Cities and Suburbs Program
People in Australian cities No target set. Increased compared to the previous financial year Source: ABS Labour Force 6202.0 and Labour Force Detailed 6291.0 (monthly and quarterly publications)
Methodology: Departmental analysis of ABS data
30. GDPs for Australia's capital cities 30.1 City Deals brokered

30.2 Projects approved to receive through the Smart Cities and Suburbs Program
People in Australian cities No target set. Increased compared to the previous financial year Source: Department of Industry, Innovation and Science's GDP estimates for capital cities, released annually
Methodology: Departmental analysis of source data

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Outcome 4: Good governance in Australian Territories through the maintenance and improvement of the overarching legislative framework for self-governing territories, and laws and services for non-self-governing territories

Providing good governance in the territories

Delivering services, legislative frameworks and infrastructure

Our services to territories program works to ensure residents of non-self-governing territories have access to equivalent scope and quality of services provided to residents in similar sized mainland communities

Environment

Through managing the government's services to territories budget program, we provide good governance in our diverse territories—Norfolk Island, Christmas Island, the Cocos (Keeling) Islands, the Jervis Bay Territory, the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) and the Northern Territory (NT). Good governance in the territories also relies on the commitment, contributions and efforts of a large number of stakeholders. We share this responsibility with other government entities, state and local governments, service providers and local stakeholders. We work closely with these groups to achieve this purpose.

Program 4.1—Services to territories

The services to territories budget program provides good governance in the Australian Territories by maintaining and improving the overarching legislative framework for self-governing territories, and laws, services and infrastructure for non-self-governing external territories and the Jervis Bay Territory.

Over the forward years of this plan we will:

  • manage the government's services to territories programs, in particular to deliver essential services and infrastructure to the external territories and the Jervis Bay Territory
  • develop options and provide policy advice on supporting Australia's territories, including:
    • effective oversight of the government's interest in the ACT and NT
    • maintaining effective service delivery, governance and legal frameworks to the external territories and the Jervis Bay Territory
Key activities2018–192019–202020–212021–22
Develop and implement long-term service delivery arrangements with the Norfolk Island community and service delivery partners
active
active
Improve coordination of service delivery arrangements in the Jervis Bay Territory, implementing agreed improvements to service delivery identified through the 2017–18 co-design process with the community
active
Support economic transition in the Indian Ocean Territories following changes to the Immigration Detention Centre (contingency use only) on Christmas Island and uncertainty about mining activity
active
active
Manage the delivery of priority infrastructure and the landslide risk assessment for Christmas Island
active
Success measures

In delivering our key activities we will influence our success measures which align to the program outcome and our departmental purpose. The targets we set are influenced by the contributions of other Australian Government departments and agencies, state, territory and local governments, and industry. Our department has included departmental outputs and targets to show this.

What will be measured?Departmental contribution to the measureWho benefits?TargetData sources and methodology
2018–192019–202020–212021–22
31. Communities in the external territories and the Jervis Bay Territory have comparable services and essential infrastructure to mainland Australia 31.1 Service delivery arrangements and contracts in place for Norfolk Island

31.2 Service delivery arrangements and contracts in place for the Indian Ocean Territories

31.3 Service delivery arrangements and contracts in place for the Jervis Bay Territory
People in external territories and the Jervis Bay Territory Service delivery arrangements and contracts deliver comparable services and essential infrastructure to mainland Australia Source: Reporting by service providers
Methodology: Analysis of reporting from service providers
32. Legal and governance frameworks in the external territories and the Jervis Bay Territory are appropriate for the protection and wellbeing of the communities 32.1 Legislation administered to provide for applied law powers and functions in the external territories and the Jervis Bay Territory People in external territories and the Jervis Bay Territory Legal and governance frameworks comparable to mainland Australia Source: Review of state-type frameworks and advice from state service providers
Methodology: Analysis of state level framework and advice

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Capability

The department comprises of three high-level business groups; Transport Group, Infrastructure Group and Regional and Territories Group (incorporating corporate functions), encompassing 10 business divisions. While each group and corresponding division have specific and targeted roles in delivering our outcomes and our purposes, their work is informed by a broader departmental vision to:

  1. have a view on the right outcome
  2. be a respected policy reform driving agency
  3. be a leading program and project delivery agency
  4. be an effective and leading regulatory agency
  5. be a leading Australian agency for investment strategy and planning
  6. foster and support a high-performing workforce

strategic vision

Workforce planning

We continue to build a capable, skilled, professional and responsive workforce which enables the department to deliver on its government priorities, through the provision of high quality services to our key stakeholders. We achieve this through modern and innovative people strategies which build and sustain a workplace culture of inclusivity, integrity and professionalism. We continue to be well positioned to anticipate and adapt to future challenges. We are regarded as a public-sector employer of choice, due to the variety and rewarding work of the department, and its positive economic and social impact on all Australians.

Our Workforce Strategy 2016–19, while being refreshed, continues to provide a clear path for the department's varied workforce challenges. These include the ongoing rapid advances in new technologies, shifting demographic profiles, and the use of flexible working arrangements. The strategy details the work of the People and Performance Branch in ensuring staff are equipped to meet immediate and emerging challenges. This includes collaborating with the department's leaders to establish agency-wide integrated human resource strategies that build and extend workforce capability.

Key deliverables from the workforce strategy include:

  • identifying our strategic workforce priorities over the medium to long term
  • investing in and strengthening critical professional capabilities for the work of the department now, as well as in the future
  • equipping the department with strong leadership to successfully deliver the strategic goals and priorities for the future
  • attracting talented people who align with our needs
  • maintaining and developing our existing talent, including developing the people to lead in the future
  • aligning our approaches to recruitment, development, performance and retention, so that we can ensure our workforce is well positioned for future challenges

Work health and safety

The department is focused on three overarching work health and safety (WHS) objectives: lead, educate and respond. In reaching these objectives we aim to establish a first-class WHS management system and assure the health and safety of our people.

The department will:

  • implement robust governance processes and confront risks to the health and safety of its staff
  • provide skills and knowledge to support staff in dealing with WHS hazards and risks that arise in the conduct of work
  • maintain a proactive focus on the mitigation of risks

All injuries are preventable and the department aspires to zero harm. This will be demonstrated through the words and actions of our leaders and managers.

ICT capability

Our Information Services Branch is fundamental to our processes and outputs and is a core capability for delivering services to clients and employees. Our Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Strategic Plan and Secure Cloud Computing Strategy align ICT investments and deliverables to meet our capability needs. Our plans and governance allow other environmental factors such as whole-of-government, security, fit for purpose, innovation and value to further define our ICT services and priorities.

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Planning and reporting framework

Our internal and external planning and reporting activities provide information on our resourcing, operations and performance which support the achievement of our outcomes and purposes. The relationship between these activities is illustrated in the diagram below. The framework allows us to set out what we plan to do at the beginning of the year and what we have achieved by the end of the year, but also to think longer-term and plan for the future.

Planning and reporting cycle

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Risk management

Risk management in the department identifies and addresses the uncertainty in achieving our purposes, ideally before commencing an activity. The outcome of good risk management is to appropriately mitigate risk and assist with identifying opportunities, thereby enhancing our ability to provide the government with good policy, program and regulatory options.

Success depends upon developing our people, strengthening and adapting systems, and forging strong relationships with stakeholders. By carefully applying appropriate risk management principles that are fit for purpose, we will maximise the efficiency and effectiveness of planning, decision-making, managing uncertainty and our use of resources to obtain desired outcomes.

Our risk framework is designed to:

  • ensure risk management supports our purposes
  • ensure risk management is embedded in all activities to enable better outcomes to be achieved
  • define our risk appetite and tolerance
  • support a culture which encourages people to report incidents and take ownership of problems
  • ensure stakeholders are consulted to enable the consideration of a broader perspective
  • promote communicating risk information within the department, across the government and with our stakeholders with who we work to better manage shared risks
  • align with the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and the government's expectations as described in the Commonwealth Risk Management Policy finance.gov.au/comcover/risk-management
The department's enterprise risks are:
A workforce unable to meet the emerging needs of the government and community
Program outcomes not aligned with policy objectives
Failure of service delivery or programs
Regulatory compliance is not adequately monitored
Regulatory issues are not systematically identified and rectified
Failure to align and steer policy direction and communicate objectives, benefits and progress
Failure to integrate transport and regional development policy with broader government objectives
Integrity of staff is compromised resulting in complex unethical or illegal practices

These risks are regularly monitored by the Executive Board to ensure that we have effective controls that reflect the department's risk appetite.

Evaluation and review

To achieve our purposes we must systematically and objectively evaluate and review our activities.

The department's evaluation strategy is now in its eighth year. The strategy aims to embed a culture of reflective and evaluative thinking to ensure we get the best results from the policies, programs and regulatory activities we implement.

We offer our employees training, mentoring and information about evaluation. This includes developing policy, program and regulatory logics and monitoring and evaluation strategies.

The departmental evaluation schedule, approved annually by the Secretary, lists our planned evaluation activities. The Monitoring and Evaluation Capability Strategy 2017–20 and the Monitoring and Evaluation Resource Booklet are online at infrastructure.gov.au/department/publications/evaluation-capability-building.aspx.

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Values

We are committed to the Australian Public Service (APS) Values set out in the Public Service Act 1999.

Impartial

The APS is apolitical and provides the government with advice that is frank, honest, timely and based on the best available evidence.

Committed to service

The APS is professional, objective, innovative and efficient, and works collaboratively to achieve the best results for the Australian community and the government.

Accountable

The APS is open and accountable to the Australian community under the law and within the framework of Ministerial responsibility.

Respectful

The APS respects all people, including their rights and their heritage.

Ethical

The APS demonstrates leadership, is trustworthy, and acts with integrity in all that it does.

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Last Updated: 18 September, 2018